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Oracle SQL Tutorial 18 - How to Create Foreign Keys
 
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In this video we are going to be creating foreign keys. I highly recommend watching the previous video before you watch this one. Essentially, we are creating a very simple database for a system where we can create projects and add people to those projects. We started with the users table: --Delete the table if needed: --DROP TABLE users; CREATE TABLE users( user_id NUMBER, username VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) UNIQUE, CONSTRAINT users_pk PRIMARY KEY (user_id) ); Now we are going to create a table for projects with a column that is a foreign key to the username. We're going to want to make this match data types: CREATE TABLE projects( project_id NUMBER, project_name VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) UNIQUE, creator VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) ) Next, we need to add the column attributes we decided on last video: CREATE TABLE projects( project_id NUMBER, project_name VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) UNIQUE, creator VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) NOT NULL ) NOT NULL because we want every project to have a creator, but we are not labeling UNIQUE because that means we could only have a specific username once in the table. We want to allow a user to create multiple projects. We also need to add a primary key: CREATE TABLE projects( project_id NUMBER, project_name VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) UNIQUE, creator VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) NOT NULL, CONSTRAINT projects_pk PRIMARY KEY (username) ) Now, the question that remains is, how can I tell Oracle that I want the username to reference the username column of the other table? We have to make a foreign key constraint. As you've learned from the previous videos, there are about three ways to create constraints. You can do it inline at the column level, unnamed. You can do it at the column level, named, and you can do it at the Table level, named. Usually the table-level is preferred, but I will quickly remind you how to do all three again. CREATE TABLE projects( project_id NUMBER, project_name VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) UNIQUE, creator VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) NOT NULL REFERENCES users (username), CONSTRAINT projects_pk PRIMARY KEY (project_id) ) This works, but if we want to name it, we should do this: CREATE TABLE projects( project_id NUMBER, project_name VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) UNIQUE, creator VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) NOT NULL CONSTRAINT projects_users_fk REFERENCES users (username), CONSTRAINT projects_pk PRIMARY KEY (project_id) ) This works, but the preferred method is to do it at the table level: CREATE TABLE projects( project_id NUMBER, project_name VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) UNIQUE, creator VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) NOT NULL, CONSTRAINT projects_pk PRIMARY KEY (project_id), CONSTRAINT projects_users_fk FOREIGN KEY (creator) REFERENCES users (username) ) Great! So you've learned how to create a foreign key, now we can see it inside of Oracle SQL Developer. One important thing when it comes to foreign keys is what happens when have data in your database and you try to delete the parent row that a row in the child table references? In the next video we are going to configure that using ON DELETE. See you all then and if you enjoy this series, please do me a huge favor by liking the video and subscribing to my YouTube channel. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ HELP ME! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 24212 Caleb Curry
Partitioning in Oracle Explained with Real project Examples : Introduction
 
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This Video series will explain partitioning and its use cases referencing real project examples from different domain. It will explain what when and why of partitioning in a simple but elaborate manner. This is the 1st video which explains why partitioning is required and what are the advantages we gain from it. The following videos will explain when should we do it and how.
Views: 27514 Tech Coach
Database Design 50 - Self Join
 
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This video will dive into the topic of self joins. Self joins are when you join a table with itself. This can be useful for replacing values within the table or having more than one of the same column for some reason. Self Joins can definitely be complicated! Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. More content: http://CalebCurry.com Courses for Download: http://www.udemy.com/u/calebcurry/ (Use the coupon code "YouTubeDiscount" without the quotes) Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://Twitter.com/calebCurry Subscribe (it's free!): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZUyPT9DkJWmS_DzdOi7RIA?sub_confirmation=1 Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 20404 Caleb Curry
How to get Parent Table, Reference Table, Foreign Key Constraint Name and Columns in SQL Server-P 71
 
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SQL Server / T-SQL Tutorial Scenario: You are working as SQL Server Developer, you are asked to provide the query that should return all the parent tables, reference tables, Foreign Key Constraints and Columns used in Foreign Key Constraint definition. Link to scripts used in SQL Server / TSQL Tutorial Video http://www.techbrothersit.com/2016/04/how-to-get-parent-table-reference-table.html Check out our website for Different SQL Server, MSBI tutorials and interview questions such as SQL Server Reporting Services(SSRS) Tutorial SQL Server Integration Services(SSIS) Tutorial SQL Server DBA Tutorial SQL Server / TSQL Tutorial ( Beginner to Advance) http://www.techbrothersit.com/
Views: 3413 TechBrothersIT
SQL Tutorial - 13: Inserting Data Into a Table From Another Table
 
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In this tutorial we'll learn to use the INSERT Query to copy data from one table into another.
Views: 258912 The Bad Tutorials
Oracle SQL Tutorial 17 - Designing Our Foreign Keys
 
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We are going to continue working with the users table that we've started with, but we are going to add a few tables. Imagine a system where you can create projects. And users can be added to these projects. So this could be some kind of productivity app or a project management solution, think of JIRA. We are going to start with three tables. The first table is going to be a users table that contains all of the information about each user's account. We are then going to have a table that is called projects. Each project will have data about the project and a foreign key that is the creator of the project. This is a situation where the database design depends a lot on the business rules and requirements of the application. Is it appropriate to have only one creator, or can it have multiple creators? We are going to design it with only one creator per project to increase simplicity. The third table is going to be used to record what users are part of certain projects. This situation is a many to many relationship because we've decided that one user can be a part of multiple projects and an individual project can have multiple members working on it. Because this is a many to many relationship, it calls for an intermediary table, project_users. First, we will draw out the user table. We will have a user_id, username, first_name, and last_name. Now, this is our parent table, because it has no foreign keys. Now, this is our parent table, because it has no foreign keys. Other tables are going to be referencing this table, so they would be the children. The project table will have a project_id, title, description, and creator. The column that needs to be a foreign key is the creator. Let's move on to the next table and we'll get back to the foreign key of the project table. The other table was project_users. Knowing that this is an intermediary table, immediately we know that the first two columns are going to be foreign keys to the each of the other tables. Now, let's ask the important questions about the foreign keys. Let's first start with the project table's user column. The first thing we need to ask is what column does it need to reference? Remember, the only options are the columns that are UNIQUE. Our candidates are user_id and username. For now, let's go with username as it makes things easier to work with. Once we go into learning about joins, we will talk about joining things by ID. Different people do it different ways, with the majority using only ID columns for primary and foreign keys, but it's important to be familiar with different ways of doing things. The important thing to remember is that keys should never change, so if we should only reference the username if a user's username will never change. Should the foreign key be labeled UNIQUE? If yes, it means that a user can only create one project. I vote no. Should the foreign key be labeled NOT NULL? If not, it means that a project can exist without a creator. I vote no. Moving on to the next table, I think I'll have the columns reference the project's id and user's id, so we can get some experience referencing surrogate keys. We can apply to these foreign keys the same questions we asked about the other foreign key, and I would encourage you to do so and really think about why. But I can tell you that we are not going to want them to be NOT NULL, but not UNIQUE. Now that we have a pretty decent database design, we can proceed with creating our database. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ HELP ME! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 10909 Caleb Curry
SQL Server 27 - How to Create FOREIGN KEY Constraints
 
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In the previous video we set up an entire table. The problem with this table is that the species column is just plain text. The problem with this is that there is a higher probability of incorrect data and if we have tons of animals in here there will be a lot of redundant information. The solution to this is to change this species to a foreign key to another table. Remember that when you create a foreign key it is a child to a parent. The thing you need to know is that the parent has to exist before the child so the child has something to reference. So let's create the parent table. CREATE TABLE Species( ID INT PRIMARY KEY IDENTITY, Species VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL UNIQUE, FriendlyName VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL //NOT UNIQUE because multiple rows could be same category (Ex: Bunny) ); Now, the friendly name will likely have redundant data, so maybe later we can add a table for animal categories or something, but let's not overwhelm ourselves quite yet. Maybe in a few videos. Now that we have created that table, we can recreate the table that references it. The first thing to know when creating a foreign key is that the data type must match. Because the ID column in the species table is of type INT, we should make our Species column in the Animals table also of type INT. Secondly, to make this a foreign key we add REFERENCES Species(ID) to the Species column. DROP TABLE IF EXISTS Animals; CREATE TABLE Animals( ID INT PRIMARY KEY IDENTITY, Name VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL, Species INT NOT NULL REFERENCES Species(ID), ContactEmail VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL UNIQUE ); ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 7609 Caleb Curry
Simple Recursion in SQL
 
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A simple example of recursion using SQL Server and Common Table Expressions (CTEs). Thanks to +Nikola Gujanicic for the request.
Views: 24349 Database by Doug
Connect Excel to Oracle Database
 
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How to connect an Oracle Database to Microsoft Excel. https://www.elance.com/s/edtemb/
Views: 102778 i_marketing
Self Join operation with Example | Database Management System
 
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#SelfJoin #SQlDBMS #FreeEducationGATE
Views: 42305 Gate Smashers
Oracle SQL Tutorial 15 - How to Add Primary Key Constraints
 
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The goal of this video is to take the CREATE TABLE statement we have and walk through the different ways to create primary keys. This and foreign keys are the most common constraints, so we need to make sure that you have this one down. Once we have a more complex database design with multiple tables, we will learn the proper way to create foreign keys. For now, I am going to keep all of our constraints at the column level, unnamed. The only exception is the primary key, because that is what we are focusing on in this video. The first way to create the primary key is at the column level, unnamed. The primary key is very important because it what we use to distinguish rows from one another. Every table you create is going to need a primary key, and I suggest putting a lot of effort into making sure your keys are set up correctly and organized. --Delete the table if needed: DROP TABLE users; CREATE TABLE users( user_id NUMBER PRIMARY KEY, username VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) NOT NULL UNIQUE ) The next way is at the column level, but named: --Delete the table: DROP TABLE users; CREATE TABLE users( user_id NUMBER CONSTRAINT users_pk PRIMARY KEY, username VARCHAR2(50 CHAR)NOT NULL UNIQUE ) The general naming convention here is the table name followed by an underscore, followed by pk for primary key. Finally, the third way, which is at the table level, is the way we are going to create our primary key: --Delete the table: DROP TABLE users; CREATE TABLE users( user_id NUMBER, username VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) NOT NULL UNIQUE, CONSTRAINT users_pk PRIMARY KEY (user_id) ) Now, once you've created these constraints, you can use Oracle SQL Developer to find these constraints. Open your databases in the connections tab and find the table in the Tables folder. Double click your table and travel to the Constraints tab. You can tell here that the UNIQUE constraint still exists in this table, but it has a pretty disgusting name. It kind of wants to make me puke. Referencing that constraint in the future with that wacky name would be a burden. Engrave these three options in your head so that you can use any of them whenever you need and can read other peoples' code. Thank you for sticking with the series thus far. In the next video, we will be…doing something. See you then! :) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me on Patreon! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 16209 Caleb Curry
sql - how to delete data from table which has self referencing foreign key column
 
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UPDATE employee SET manager_id=NULL DELETE FROM employee How to delete data from Table which has self referecing foreign key In this table Manager_Id is referring customer_id Now we try to delete data from this table Error Code: 1451 Cannot delete or update a parent row: a foreign key constraint fails (`my_retail_data`.`employee`, CONSTRAINT `employee_fk0` FOREIGN KEY (`manager_id`) REFERENCES `employee` (`employee_id`)) to overcome, first we need set data in mangaer_id column as nulls Try, deleting data now from the Employee table Done!
Views: 393 Data Disc
PL/SQL tutorial 76: Introduction to FORALL statement in Oracle Database
 
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RebellionRider.com presents Introduction to bulk Data processing using FORALL statement in Oracle Database by Manish Sharma ------------------------------------------------------------------------ ►►►LINKS◄◄◄ Blog: http://bit.ly/forall-01 Previous Tutorial ► PL/SQL Bulk Collect with LIMIT clause ►SQL Error ORA-00942 Table or View Does Not Exist in Oracle Database http://bit.ly/ora-00942 ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►Make sure you SUBSCRIBE and be the 1st one to see my videos! ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►►►Find me on Social Media◄◄◄ Follow What I am up to as it happens on https://twitter.com/rebellionrider http://instagram.com/rebellionrider https://plus.google.com/+Rebellionrider http://in.linkedin.com/in/mannbhardwaj/ ___Facebook Official Page of Manish Sharma___ https://www.facebook.com/TheRebellionRider/ ___Facebook Official Page of RebellionRider.com___ https://www.facebook.com/RebellionRider.official/ You can also Email me at for E-mail address please check the About section Please please LIKE and SHARE my videos it makes me happy. Thanks for liking, commenting, sharing and watching more of our videos This is Manish from RebellionRider.com ♥ I LOVE ALL MY VIEWERS AND SUBSCRIBERS
Views: 7311 Manish Sharma
Oracle SQL Tutorial 16 - Parent Child Relationships
 
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So far in this series we have discussed database design, creating tables, and constraints. We've brought up the concept of foreign keys, but we have not explained how to create them. That is the goal of this video and the upcoming videos. We want to study those foreign keys! Let's make them not so foreign. Let's learn the proper way to define a foreign key. As a reminder, a foreign key is a column that references a column of another table. The column it references must either be a primary key, or have the UNIQUE constraint. This means that every value inside of the column that is labeled as a foreign key, there must be that value in some row of the referenced column. As an example, imagine that we have the users table, and we have a table service_requests. We could have a column in the service_request that references a column in the users table. Usually this would be the primary key that is referenced, but there is nothing stopping you from referencing a unique column. Just for fun, let's go through an example using the username column. If we have a service_requests table, every single row within the table is going to be what some would consider an instance of a service_request. This means that the table columns are like the blueprint for what a service request looks like and then each row is an individual service request. If we have one of the columns labeled as a foreign key to the username of the users table, what does that mean practically? It means that for a single row, the value for that column must be a value that exists in the users table. We could have a service_request submitted by a user with the username of Yoloswagman. This means that there must be a row inside of the users table that has the value Yoloswagman for the username column. This brings up the concept of parent and child relationships. Yoloswagman in this situation is the parent, and his service request is the child. When we draw it out, it makes sense why a primary key must be UNIQUE. If we had two Yoloswagmans, the child would not know which column is the parent. The same applies if we were using IDs and we had So remember, always reference a primary key or a column with the UNIQUE constraint. Now, I have a question for you. Do foreign keys automatically have the UNIQUE constraint, just like primary keys? The answer is no. A parent row can have many child rows. It makes sense because the user could submit multiple service requests. Can we force the column to be unique? Absolutely. If that was the case, the user could only make one service request. Another question. Do foreign keys automatically have the NOT NULL constraint, just like primary keys? The answer is no. Essentially what this means is that a child could be created with no parent. Can we force the column to be NOT NULL? Absolutely. It is ok in some situations to allow the row to be null, but in this situation it makes no sense. It would be wise for us to add that constraint ourselves. So now that you understand some more differences between primary and foreign keys and parent child relationships, take all of these questions into consideration when you are creating foreign keys. In the next video, we are going to start a small project that is going to require multiple tables. We'll take a video to design our structure and then we'll get to creating those foreign keys in Oracle SQL Developer. Stick around and if you like these videos please be a serious supporter and subscribe to my channel. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ HELP ME! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 13714 Caleb Curry
Oracle SQL Tutorial 19 - ON DELETE (SET NULL and CASCADE)
 
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Welcome everyone! Something you need to consider when you are creating foreign keys is what happens if you delete the parent? As a reminder, the parent is the row that has the value you are referencing in the row that has a foreign key. Why is this something important to consider? It's important because foreign keys need to protect us from two primary things, unacceptable INSERT statements, and unacceptable DELETE statements. Let's see what happens when we try to insert incorrect data into the table with the foreign key: INSERT INTO projects VALUES (1, 'Update website homepage', 'CalebCurry') The response tells us plainly that there is no such user in the users table. So this works correctly. Deleting data on the other hand works a bit differently because the database does not know what you want to do with the child row when you delete the parent from the parent table. By default, we will get an error message that prevents the parent from being deleted, but there are some other options. How do we configure this? This is where the ON DELETE statement comes in. We add the keywords ON DELETE right after the foreign key and then we can give it the option of CASCADE or SET NULL. CASCADE means that if we delete the parent, we are also going to delete the child. In our situation what that means is that if somebody creates a project in our project table and then that persons account gets deleted, all of the projects he owns will also be deleted. CASCADE: CREATE TABLE projects( project_id NUMBER, Project_name VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) UNIQUE, creator VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) NOT NULL, CONSTRAINT projects_pk PRIMARY KEY (project_id), CONSTRAINT projects_users_fk FOREIGN KEY (creator) REFERENCES users (username) ON DELETE CASCADE ) SET NULL will take the value in the child table and get rid of it. What you are left with is NULL. This means that we have an orphaned child. The first thought you might have is that it is a bad thing to have an orphaned child, but in databases that is not always so. In our application if we had it set to SET NULL, when a user account gets deleted the projects would remain in existence they would just lack a creator. This might be a good thing if you are concerned about the long term survival of a project, this might be the route you want to go. It ultimately depends on the application purpose. If you don't like CASCADE or SET NULL, you can leave the entire ON DELETE statement and just have Oracle throw an error when a parent is deleted. As for us, we are going to use ON DELETE CASCADE. We need to use this with extreme caution. If you are not careful, someday you will run a delete a row and that will cascade through you database deleting a bunch of stuff you didn't want to delete. Stuff happens, so make sure you back up your database every once in eternity. Now, in the last video we started with a database design that had three tables. We've only created two in this video. In the next video we are going to create the next one, which is a little special. Then we'll finish things up by adding some indexes. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me on Patreon! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 17474 Caleb Curry
How to use lookup table in oracle Apex
 
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How to use lookup table in oracle Apex (Arabic)
Views: 220 ali saleh ali
SQL Foreign Key Constraints
 
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Jamie King of Neumont University showing what are and how to add foreign key constraints.
Views: 57604 Jamie King
[en] SQL Developer- How to find which tables reference a given table in Oracle SQL Developer?
 
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The table can reference to one or more tables, and also be referenced by others. We are able to show it on the model tab of Oracle SQL Developer. Tiếng Việt: https://youtu.be/qhxEDL4_UY0
Views: 57 1Click2beDBA
PL/SQL tutorial 57: PL/SQL Collection Associative Array in Oracle Database
 
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Manish Sharma from RebellionRider presents you the latest PL/SQL tutorial on Collection ASSOCIATIVE ARRAY. In this video, you will learn – - What are Associative Arrays? - How to create Associative Arrays? - How to Insert & Update the data of Associative Array and - How to retrieve the data from an Associative array using two different ways? So if you are wondering whether associative array is a persistent form of collection or not; Is it bounded or unbounded in nature; why should we use this specific collection over others such as VARRAY or Nested Table; What are the differences or similarities between associative array and other collections? Then go ahead and watch the video to find out the answers to all these questions. Hope you will enjoy watching. Do make sure to Like and Share this post/video because that will help others in learning as well as help me and my channel in reaching out. This way we can educate more and more people for FREE. Most importantly SUBSCRIBE to the channel as many such interesting tutorials are coming your way. Thanks. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ ►►►LINKS◄◄◄ Blog: http://bit.ly/associative-array Previous Tutorial ►While Loop: https://youtu.be/IIlc4Sr7kFE ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►Make sure you SUBSCRIBE and be the 1st one to see my videos! ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►►►Find me on Social Media◄◄◄ Follow What I am up to as it happens on https://twitter.com/rebellionrider http://instagram.com/rebellionrider https://plus.google.com/+Rebellionrider http://in.linkedin.com/in/mannbhardwaj/ ___Facebook Official Page of Manish Sharma___ https://www.facebook.com/TheRebellionRider/ ___Facebook Official Page of RebellionRider.com___ https://www.facebook.com/RebellionRider.official/ You can also Email me at for E-mail address please check the About section Please please LIKE and SHARE my videos it makes me happy. Thanks for liking, commenting, sharing and watching more of our videos This is Manish from RebellionRider.com ♥ I LOVE ALL MY VIEWERS AND SUBSCRIBERS
Views: 13815 Manish Sharma
Foreign Key | Database Management System
 
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To ask your doubts on this topic and much more, click on this Direct Link: http://www.techtud.com/video-lecture/lecture-foreign-key IMPORTANT LINKS: 1) Official Website: http://www.techtud.com/ 2) Virtual GATE: http://virtualgate.in/login/index.php Both of the above mentioned platforms are COMPLETELY FREE, so feel free to Explore, Learn, Practice & Share! Our Social Media Links: Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/techtuduniversity Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/virtualgate Google+ Page: https://plus.google.com/+techtud/posts Last but not the least, SUBSCRIBE our YouTube channel to stay updated about the regularly uploaded new videos.
Views: 272408 Techtud
SQL script to insert into many to many table
 
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Text Article http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2017/02/sql-script-to-insert-into-many-to-many.html Slides http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2017/02/sql-script-to-insert-into-many-to-many_6.html SQL Server Interview Questions and Answers text articles & slides http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2014/05/sql-server-interview-questions-and.html SQL Server Interview Questions and Answers playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6n9fhu94yhXcztdLO7i6mdyaegC8CJwR All Dot Net and SQL Server Tutorials in English https://www.youtube.com/user/kudvenkat/playlists?view=1&sort=dd All Dot Net and SQL Server Tutorials in Arabic https://www.youtube.com/c/KudvenkatArabic/playlists In this video we will discuss how to insert data into a table that has many-to-many relationship Create table Students ( Id int primary key identity, StudentName nvarchar(50) ) Go Create table Courses ( Id int primary key identity, CourseName nvarchar(50) ) Go Create table StudentCourses ( StudentId int not null foreign key references Students(Id), CourseId int not null foreign key references Courses(Id) ) Go Students - Id column is identity column Courses - Id column is identity column StudentCourses - StudentId and CourseId columns are foreign keys referencing Id column in Students and Courses tables As you can see, StudentCourses is a bridge table that has many to many relationship with Students and Courses tables. This means a given student can be enrolled into many courses and a given course can have many students enrolled. Below is the question asked in an interview for SQL Server Developer role. Write a SQL script to insert data into StudentCourses table. Here are the rules that your script should follow. 1. There will be 2 inputs for the script Student Name - The name of the student who wants to enroll into a course Course Name - The name of the course the student wants to enroll into 2. If the student is already in the Students table, then use that existing Student Id. If the student is not already in the Students table, then a row for that student must be inserted into the Students table, and use that new student id. 3. Along the same lines, if the course is already in the Courses table, then use that existing Course Id. If the course is not already in the Courses table, then a row for that course must be inserted into the Courses table, and use that new course id. 4. There should be no duplicate student course enrollments, i.e a given student must not be enrolled in the same course twice. For example, Tom must not be enrolled in C# course twice. Answer : To avoid duplicate student course enrollments create a composite primary key on StudentId and CourseId columns in StudentCourses table. With this composite primary key in place, if someone tries to enroll the same student in the same course again we get violation of primary key constraint error. Alter table StudentCourses Add Constraint PK_StudentCourses Primary Key Clustered (CourseId, StudentId) Here is the SQL script that inserts data into the 3 tables as expected Declare @StudentName nvarchar(50) = 'Sam' Declare @CourseName nvarchar(50) = 'SQL Server' Declare @StudentId int Declare @CourseId int -- If the student already exists, use the existing student ID Select @StudentId = Id from Students where StudentName = @StudentName -- If the course already exists, use the existing course ID Select @CourseId = Id from Courses where CourseName = @CourseName -- If the student does not exist in the Students table If (@StudentId is null) Begin -- Insert the student Insert into Students values(@StudentName) -- Get the Id of the student Select @StudentId = SCOPE_IDENTITY() End -- If the course does not exist in the Courses table If (@CourseId is null) Begin -- Insert the course Insert into Courses values(@CourseName) -- Get the Id of the course Select @CourseId = SCOPE_IDENTITY() End -- Insert StudentId & CourseId in StudentCourses table Insert into StudentCourses values(@StudentId, @CourseId) If required, we can very easily convert this into a stored procedure as shown below. Create procedure spInsertIntoStudentCourses @StudentName nvarchar(50), @CourseName nvarchar(50) as Begin Declare @StudentId int Declare @CourseId int Select @StudentId = Id from Students where StudentName = @StudentName Select @CourseId = Id from Courses where CourseName = @CourseName If (@StudentId is null) Begin Insert into Students values(@StudentName) Select @StudentId = SCOPE_IDENTITY() End If (@CourseId is null) Begin Insert into Courses values(@CourseName) Select @CourseId = SCOPE_IDENTITY() End Insert into StudentCourses values(@StudentId, @CourseId) End Use the following statement to execute the stored procedure Execute spInsertIntoStudentCourses 'Tom','C#'
Views: 90009 kudvenkat
Difference between rows and range
 
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range vs rows in sql server difference between rows clause and range clause in sql server range clause vs rows clause in sql server sql server running total query running total example in sql server In this video we will discuss the difference between rows and range in SQL Server. This is continuation to Part 116. Please watch Part 116 from SQL Server tutorial before proceeding. Let us understand the difference with an example. We will use the following Employees table in this demo. SQL Script to create the Employees table Create Table Employees ( Id int primary key, Name nvarchar(50), Salary int ) Go Insert Into Employees Values (1, 'Mark', 1000) Insert Into Employees Values (2, 'John', 2000) Insert Into Employees Values (3, 'Pam', 3000) Insert Into Employees Values (4, 'Sara', 4000) Insert Into Employees Values (5, 'Todd', 5000) Go Calculate the running total of Salary and display it against every employee row The following query calculates the running total. We have not specified an explicit value for ROWS or RANGE clause. SELECT Name, Salary, SUM(Salary) OVER(ORDER BY Salary) AS RunningTotal FROM Employees So the above query is using the default value which is RANGE BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND CURRENT ROW This means the above query can be re-written using an explicit value for ROWS or RANGE clause as shown below. SELECT Name, Salary, SUM(Salary) OVER(ORDER BY Salary RANGE BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND CURRENT ROW) AS RunningTotal FROM Employees We can also achieve the same result, by replacing RANGE with ROWS SELECT Name, Salary, SUM(Salary) OVER(ORDER BY Salary ROWS BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND CURRENT ROW) AS RunningTotal FROM Employees What is the difference between ROWS and RANGE To understand the difference we need some duplicate values for the Salary column in the Employees table. Execute the following UPDATE script to introduce duplicate values in the Salary column Update Employees set Salary = 1000 where Id = 2 Update Employees set Salary = 3000 where Id = 4 Go Now execute the following query. Notice that we get the running total as expected. SELECT Name, Salary, SUM(Salary) OVER(ORDER BY Salary ROWS BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND CURRENT ROW) AS RunningTotal FROM Employees The following query uses RANGE instead of ROWS SELECT Name, Salary, SUM(Salary) OVER(ORDER BY Salary RANGE BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND CURRENT ROW) AS RunningTotal FROM Employees Notice we don't get the running total as expected. So, the main difference between ROWS and RANGE is in the way duplicate rows are treated. ROWS treat duplicates as distinct values, where as RANGE treats them as a single entity. All together side by side. The following query shows how running total changes 1. When no value is specified for ROWS or RANGE clause 2. When RANGE clause is used explicitly with it's default value 3. When ROWS clause is used instead of RANGE clause SELECT Name, Salary, SUM(Salary) OVER(ORDER BY Salary) AS [Default], SUM(Salary) OVER(ORDER BY Salary RANGE BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND CURRENT ROW) AS [Range], SUM(Salary) OVER(ORDER BY Salary ROWS BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND CURRENT ROW) AS [Rows] FROM Employees Text version of the video http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2015/10/difference-between-rows-and-range.html Slides http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2015/10/difference-between-rows-and-range_8.html All SQL Server Text Articles http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/p/free-sql-server-video-tutorials-for.html All SQL Server Slides http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/p/sql-server.html All Dot Net and SQL Server Tutorials in English https://www.youtube.com/user/kudvenkat/playlists?view=1&sort=dd All Dot Net and SQL Server Tutorials in Arabic https://www.youtube.com/c/KudvenkatArabic/playlists
Views: 35501 kudvenkat
How to insert multi tables in Oracle using Irwsoft Data Framework.
 
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This video will show you how to insert multi values into multi tables on Oracle. Using Irwsoft Data Framework makes your job easier to do.
How to Join two tables in a update statement
 
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This video is to understand how we can update a column of a table, based on the data present on the other table, and both the tables having a common column. Its a complicated update statement that can be used to update with different conditions.
Views: 9385 Kishan Mashru
:Old and :New value in pl sql triggers
 
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A plsql tutorial about how to reference old and new column value of a table using :old or :new and how they are related to insert, update or delete dml transaction. Go through this oracle tutorial which will give you the concept about how to use :old and :new references. Here is the trigger example. create or replace trigger trigger_name before insert or update or delete on table_name for each row begin if inserting then dbms_output.put_line("Before inserting Old value is "||:old.column_name||" New value : "||:new.column_name); elsif updating then dbms_output.put_line("Before updating Old value is "||:old.column_name||" New value : "||:new.column_name); elsif deleting then dbms_output.put_line("Before deleting Old value is "||:old.column_name||" New value : "||:new.column_name); end if; end;
Views: 4106 Subhroneel Ganguly
Oracle SQL Tutorial 20 - How to Create Composite Primary Keys
 
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This video is going to be a tutorial on how to create composite and compound keys. The difference between a composite and compound key is that a composite key can consist of any columns while a compound key has to consist of columns that are all keys themselves. We will be working with a compound key because we are going to be using the an intermediary table that has two foreign keys. The combination of both of the keys have to be unique. First, if we have any other CREATE TABLE commands, we are going to comment those out. We will space out the CREATE TABLE to have each column on a line, then we will add constraints as needed. CREATE TABLE project_users( project_id, user_id ) Now, let's add the data types: CREATE TABLE project_users( project_id NUMBER, user_id NUMBER } Now, what about some column attributes? I'm going to make both of the columns NOT NULL because we always want the rows to have a user and a project: CREATE TABLE project_users( project_id NUMBER NOT NULL, user_id NUMBER NOT NULL } Now, let's add the foreign key constraints. Now, what do we name these? We are going to add a primary key that covers both of these columns, so I'm going to be a sinner and not give these constraints names: CREATE TABLE project_users( project_id NUMBER NOT NULL REFERENCES projects (project_id), user_id NUMBER NOT NULL REFFERENCES users (user_id) ) Now, the way we have it now is that if we delete a project in the project table, and there are any rows in the project_users table, it will throw an error and prevent deletion. I would prefer for it to also delete any project members. That would make sense because if you delete a project we want it to delete the associate between that project and certain users. The same goes for if we delete a user, we want their association with a certain project to be deleted. To do this, we need to add the ON DELETE command: CREATE TABLE project_users( project_id NUMBER NOT NULL REFERENCES projects (project_id) ON DELETE CASCADE, user_id NUMBER NOT NULL REFERENCES users (user_id) ON DELETE CASCADE, ) Finally, let's learn how to create a compound or composite key. literally, the only difference is that you put a comma and add the second table inside of the parenthesis. CREATE TABLE project_users( project_id NUMBER NOT NULL REFERENCES projects (project_id) ON DELETE CASCADE, user_id NUMBER NOT NULL REFERENCES users (user_id) ON DELETE CASCADE, CONSTRAINT project_users_pk PRIMARY KEY (project_id, user_id) ) Now, the combination of project_id and user_id cannot be null, is always unique, and has an index. The only thing we should do now is add a few indexes. We aren't done yet...In the next video we are going to figure out what columns would benefit from indexes and we'll add them to it. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ HELP ME! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 11949 Caleb Curry
SCPT 40 : Types of DDL Locks in Oracle
 
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The two basic types of locks are DML (table) locks, and DDL (dictionary) locks. A DDL lock protects the definition of a schema object while the object is referenced in a DDL operation. Oracle automatically acquires a DDL lock to prevent other DDL operations from referencing or altering the same object.
Excel Magic Trick 1349: Power Query with Input Variables from Excel Sheet to Extract Records
 
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Download File: http://people.highline.edu/mgirvin/excelisfun.htm See how to use Power Query (Get & Transform) with Input Variables from Excel Sheet to Extract Records and create a Revenue Report. Here are the steps: 1. (00:15) Introduction including Preview of Finished Solution and Preview of steps necessary to accomplish this goal. 2. (02:00) Import and transform Data Set, including removing Columns, Filter For Records and adding an extra Column to calculate Net Revenue using the Number.Round Power Query Function. 3. (06:38) Load Report to Sheet 4. (07:09) Import each Parameter/Criteria Table. 5. (07:36) Convert each Criteria Table to a single Text Item using the Record.Field Power Query Function. 6. (11:38) Declare and Insert Variables into M Code for Report 7. (14:10) Test Reporting System 8. (14:30) Create Recorded Macro To Refresh All and assign it to a Form button 9. (16:40) Test Macro and Reporting System 10. (17:25) Summary
Views: 80123 ExcelIsFun
SQL TUTORIAL - SELF JOINS Hierarchy Tables
 
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Another video brought to you by BeardedDev, bringing you tutorials on Business Intelligence, SQL Programming and Data Analysis. You can now support me on patreon - https://www.patreon.com/beardeddev This SQL Tutorial is all about hierarchy tables and self joins. We start off by looking at hierarchies that we are all aware of such as Parent and Child. The video then describes how we can create a hierarchy table in SQL Server including a Primary Key and a Foreign Key that references the Primary Key in the same table. If you are new to working with constraints in SQL Server please check out these videos: SQL Tutorial - Primary Key Constraints: https://youtu.be/DJ054rHGhRw SQL Tutorial - Create Table with Constraints: https://youtu.be/bfBnZKf2EGg If you would like to follow along with this SQL Tutorial then this is the create table statement used: CREATE TABLE dbo.Staff ( StaffId INT IDENTITY(1, 1) NOT NULL CONSTRAINT PK_Staff_StaffId PRIMARY KEY (StaffId) , StaffTitle VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL , ManagerId INT NULL CONSTRAINT FK_Staff_ManagerId FOREIGN KEY (ManagerId) REFERENCES dbo.Staff (StaffId) ) We then insert some dummy data in to the Hierarchy table and have a look at the results when executing a SELECT statement. On to discussing Self Joins, and the difference between using an INNER JOIN and a LEFT OUTER JOIN when joining a table to itself although the same applies if you were joining two separate underlying tables together. Then we apply a Self Join and return results, as the table and columns are the same we need to apply aliases. SELECT A.StaffTitle , B.StaffTitle AS ReportsTo FROM dbo.Staff AS A LEFT OUTER JOIN dbo.Staff AS B ON A.ManagerId = B.StaffId
Views: 280 BeardedDev
CTE in sql server   Part 49
 
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In this video we will learn about creating and referencing CTE's in SQL server. We will also learn how to create multiple CTE's using a single WITH clause. Text version of the video http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2012/09/common-table-expressions-part-49.html Slides http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2013/09/part-49-cte.html All SQL Server Text Articles http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/p/free-sql-server-video-tutorials-for.html All SQL Server Slides http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/p/sql-server.html All Dot Net and SQL Server Tutorials in English https://www.youtube.com/user/kudvenkat/playlists?view=1&sort=dd All Dot Net and SQL Server Tutorials in Arabic https://www.youtube.com/c/KudvenkatArabic/playlists
Views: 191480 kudvenkat
SQL Server 15 - Composite Key
 
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An interesting thing you can do with primary keys is that you can make a combination of columns the primary key. This is important when more than one column is required to make something unique. In an intermediary table, instead of having an association ID, we can have the combination of two rows as the primary key. This is known as either a compound or composite primary key. In the situation of using natural keys, composite keys are more common. For example, you could have a shopping website that allows multiple people from the same household to use a certain coupon you sent out. In this situation, you could use the address and the person's name as the natural primary key. What is the difference between a primary key and a column that has UNIQUE and NOT NULL constraints? The primary difference has to do with indexing. When you create a primary key, the column will automatically be indexed. This means that working with this data is faster. Now, we haven't talked a ton on indexes, but by default this will create a clustered index. UNIQUE constraints are also indexed by default, but the default index for a UNIQUE constraint is a non-clustered index. Clustered indexes determine how the table is actually stored, while non clustered indexes will make a sorted list that has reference to the data. This is not a life changing difference because these can actually be changed. We will discuss all of the details of indexing in future videos. As a side note, the IDENTITY column is not automatically indexed. How do we reference primary keys? This requires what is known as a foreign key, which we will discuss in the next video. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 11375 Caleb Curry
Self join in sql server - Part 14
 
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In this video we will learn about 1. Self Join - Joining a table with itself 2. Self Join is not a different type of join. It can be classified as Inner Self Join, Outer Self Join (Left, Right and Full), or Cross Self Join. Text version of the video http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2012/08/self-join-in-sql-server-part-14.html Slides http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2013/08/part-14-self-join.html All SQL Server Text Articles http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/p/free-sql-server-video-tutorials-for.html All SQL Server Slides http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/p/sql-server.html All Dot Net and SQL Server Tutorials in English https://www.youtube.com/user/kudvenkat/playlists?view=1&sort=dd All Dot Net and SQL Server Tutorials in Arabic https://www.youtube.com/c/KudvenkatArabic/playlists
Views: 355042 kudvenkat
Oracle SQL Tutorial 22 - Why Primary Keys Shouldn't Change
 
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In the last video I mentioned that with our database design it is important to make sure that nobody tries to update a user's username. What happens if they do? Nothing horrible, Oracle will just throw an error. That's not such a big deal, but if you are hoping to make some kind of application that allows someone to change their username, this is not the best set up. Why? If you look at the projects table, we have a foreign key that references the username. Let's assume for a moment that Oracle allows you to do anything with your data. That means that if a user updates their username, there will be projects created by users that don't exist. Or a user could change their name to the previous owner. To fix this problem, we would need something such as an ON UPDATE CASCADE command for our foreign key. That would mean that if the user updated their username, the columns that reference that username would also update to the new value. This exists in some database management systems, but this does not exist in Oracle at the time of this video. How do we get around this problem? I'm sure we could conjure up something to allow us to update the username, but the easiest solution is to reference the user_id instead of the username. That way, when the username is updated, nothing changes inside of the foreign key. As a general rule, primary keys should never change. Foreign keys CAN change, but they should not change because a primary key changed. So, if we did happen to use a username as a column, it would be frowned upon if the username had to change because the column it references changes. However, it would be acceptable to change the foreign key if we needed to point to a new entity in the users table. Even if a username is never intended to change, these complications bother a lot of people. You can mitigate these problems by only referencing surrogate keys in foreign keys. This has the downside though that when you retrieve the data, you are going to have to do more work to make the data readable. For example, we had a table that was called project_users. It is essentially a table that says what users are part of what projects. We could have the foreign keys reference the project's name and the user's username. Then when you could say SELECT * FROM project_users. The data would be completely readable without doing anything. If you switch to only referencing surrogate primary keys, you will have a bunch of random numbers that don't mean anything and will have to be joined with other tables…which is really super frustrating when later you have to join a thousand tables to read anything. Which side do you prefer? Pick a side. Choose wisely. I'll see you all in the next video ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ HELP ME! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 6254 Caleb Curry
PLS-4: PL/SQL Variables
 
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For Full Course Experience Please Go To http://mentorsnet.org/course_preview?course_id=5 Full Course Experience Includes 1. Access to course videos and exercises 2. View & manage your progress/pace 3. In-class projects and code reviews 4. Personal guidance from your Mentors ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- A variable is nothing but a name given to a storage area that our programs can manipulate. Each variable in PL/SQL has a specific data type, which determines the size and layout of the variable's memory; the range of values that can be stored within that memory and the set of operations that can be applied to the variable. The name of a PL/SQL variable consists of a letter optionally followed by more letters, numerals, dollar signs, underscores, and number signs and should not exceed 30 characters. By default, variable names are not case-sensitive. You cannot use a reserved PL/SQL keyword as a variable name. PL/SQL programming language allows to define various types of variables, which we will cover in subsequent chapters like date time data types, records, collections, etc. For this chapter, let us study only basic variable types. With PL/SQL you can declare variables and then use them in SQL and procedural statements anywhere that an expression can be used. Variables can be used for the following: • Temporary storage of data: Data can be temporarily stored in one or more variables for use when validating data input and for processing later in the data flow process. • Manipulation of stored values: Variables can be used for calculations and other data manipulations without accessing the database. • Reusability: After they are declared, variables can be used repeatedly in an application simply by referencing them in other statements, including other declarative statements. • Ease of maintenance: When using %TYPE and %ROWTYPE (more information on %ROWTYPE is covered in a subsequent lesson), you declare variables, basing the declarations on the definitions of database columns. If an underlying definition changes, the variable declaration changes accordingly at run time. This provides data independence, reduces maintenance costs, and allows programs to adapt as the database changes to meet new business needs. More information on %TYPE is covered later in this lesson. Types of Variables" All PL/SQL variables have a data type, which specifies a storage format, constraints, and valid range of values. PL/SQL supports four data type categories—scalar, composite, reference, and LOB (large object)—that you can use for declaring variables, constants, and pointers. • Scalar data types hold a single value. The main data types are those that correspond to column types in Oracle server tables; PL/SQL also supports Boolean variables. • Composite data types, such as records, allow groups of fields to be defined and manipulated in PL/SQL blocks. • Reference data types hold values, called pointers, that designate other program items. Reference data types are not covered in this course. • LOB data types hold values, called locators, that specify the location of large objects (such as graphic images) that are stored out of line. LOB data types are discussed in detail later in this course.
Views: 41908 Oresoft LWC
SQL - Group By Clause
 
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The more data you start interrogating the more records you will return. Its always the same, you start off with basic criteria and before you know it you are referencing several tables to obtain the information your after. The questions being asked are no longer "what was the price of that product?" the questions are more generic, like "How many orders did we do this month?". The more tables you add to a query the more likley you are going to ask summary style questions of the data as you are no longer interested in specific records your more interested in trends. To get the ball rolling on this aspect of SQL you need to start using the group by clause. This clause allows the user to summarise information in the form of aggregated values which you assign to specific fields (i.e. group to them). This video will cover the basics of how you start grouping your data into summary information. The video will start by explaining on the small scale but then show you on multiple tables how it is achieved. This is not the end of the story with group by but this should give you the knowledge to plow into some rather meaty queries. This is one of many videos which can be seen at PCTeach.me. Come join the gang!
Views: 31311 PCTeachME
Tutorial : Report with Dynamic Query.
 
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The videos is about a very important and powerful feature of oracle apex. The video shows how to create a report with dynamically generated SQL query.
Views: 8227 Oracle Testlab
How to create Sequence for a table column dynamically  in ADF
 
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Implementing Sequence in Adf Application
Views: 2232 Venky P
Oracle Jdeveloper12c ADF  - 1) how to set and get Value
 
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How to set and get Value using button Click Visit my Blog for more tutorials ... http://parasshahjdeveloper12c.blogspot.in/
Views: 2859 Paras Shah
SQL Server 29 - How to Name Constraints
 
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Our database has some primary and foreign keys, but occasionally people want to name them. That way, we can refer to a constraint specifically by a user friendly name. The trick is to simply add CONSTRAINT xx_ConstraintName before the constraint. Typically, the constraint name will follow the pattern of 2 letters to represent what type of constraint, followed by an Underscore, followed by the name. Here is an example: CREATE TABLE Interests( AnimalID INT NOT NULL, SpeciesID INT NOT NULL, CONSTRAINT PK_Interests PRIMARY KEY (AnimalID, SpeciesID) ); Now what do you name the constraint? Ultimately, that is a decision that is up to you. There are some conventions. The convention I used in this example is known as Hungarian notation. Hungarian notation is when we include what the thing is inside of the name. By prefixing the name with PK_ we automatically know that this is a primary key constraint. Some people prefer to put the PK at the end, and some people don't like to put it in there at all. Then, after the PK_, I put the name of the table to say that it is the primary key for that table. We can do the same with the foreign keys: CREATE TABLE Interests( AnimalID INT NOT NULL, SpeciesID INT NOT NULL, CONSTRAINT FK_InterestsAnimals FOREIGN KEY (AnimalID) REFERENCES Animals(ID), CONSTRAINT FK_InterestsSpecies FOREIGN KEY (AnimalID) REFERENCES Animals(ID), CONSTRAINT PK_Interests PRIMARY KEY (AnimalID, SpeciesID) ); The naming convention for the foreign keys is FK_ followed by the table name, followed by the Table it references. This is an okay naming convention. It can get confusing if you, for example had two columns from the Interests table referencing the Animals table. Much better. Why is it so important to name constraints? One of the primary reasons is so if SQL Server ever complains about a constraint violation, you will know exactly what constraint it is talking about without having to go search for it: INSERT INTO Interests VALUES (1, 3); SQL Server responds with: "The INSERT statement conflicted with the FOREIGN KEY constraint "FK_InterestsAnimals". This is an example of an INSERT statement. We will introduce this in more detail in the next video. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 2621 Caleb Curry
MySQL Database Tutorial - 22 - How to Join Tables
 
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Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/TheNewBoston-464114846956315/ GitHub - https://github.com/buckyroberts Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+BuckyRoberts LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/buckyroberts reddit - https://www.reddit.com/r/thenewboston/ Support - https://www.patreon.com/thenewboston thenewboston - https://thenewboston.com/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/bucky_roberts
Views: 344396 thenewboston
Using Theme Roller with Universal Theme - Oracle Application Express (APEX) 5
 
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See how to quickly change the look and feel of your Oracle Application Express applications. Quickly change or just preview colors for any element of your application, save to a new theme, add custom CSS or HTML, and much more.
Controlling user input in table column filters
 
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This sample shows how to customize the column filter in an af:table component to contol user query data input. The sample uses JavaScript to enfore numeric value input on an ID attribute field.
Views: 3466 ADFInsiderEssentials
[en] ORACLE 12.2 TOP New Features: a FUNCTION for checking DATATYPE. Good bye  ORA-01861, ORA-01722
 
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With this new function, you should never receive following errors again ! ORA 01861: literal does not match format string. ORA 01722: invalid number. Following is the list of supported datatype: 1. NUMBER 2. DATE 3. TIMESTAMP 4. TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE 5. BINARY_FLOAT 6. BINARY_DOUBLE 7. INTERVAL DAY TO SECOND 8. INTERVAL YEAR TO MONTH Tiếng Việt: https://youtu.be/w6gXv8-yYI4
Views: 59 1Click2beDBA
Oracle SQL PLSQL 12C Tutorial 19 - Default Value
 
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This Video Tutorial Will Describe how to set the default value of the column. This command will also work on other versions of database like Oracle 11g Database, Oracle 10g Database, Oracle 9i Database, Oracle 8i Database, Oracle 8 Database and so on. DEFAULT clause is used to set the value for the table column. DEFAULT clause insert the predefined value into the column if you left it blank while inserting the column. Full Syntax will be given in this video tutorial about how to use the DEFAULT clause. Along with live example to demonstrate DEFAULT clause. All the keywords, format, mandatory clauses etc are described in this video.
ADF table containing LOV has bug
 
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The adf table contains two lists. the first one is set auto submit=true and the second is PPR on the first one. the bug is when click on the second row in the table , the values entered in the first record is cleared
Views: 638 Tarek Bakr
Oracle APEX | Calculate Tabular Form [Rows & Columns] by JS
 
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More Details: http://geekinto.com/2017/06/21/oracle-apex-calculate-tabular-form-rows-columns-by-js/
Views: 2854 Amr Abdeen