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IFRS 3 Business Combinations - Summary
 
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http://www.ifrsbox.com This is the short summary of IFRS 3 Business Combinations. The objective of IFRS 3 is to improve the relevance, reliability and comparability of the information that a reporting entity provides in its financial statements about a business combination and its effects. IFRS 3: • Recognizes and measures the identifiable assets acquired, the liabilities assumed and any non-controlling interest in the acquiree; • Recognizes and measures the goodwill acquired in the business combination, or a gain from a bargain purchase; • Determines what information to disclose about the business combination. An investment must constitute a business before we can apply IFRS 3. IFRS 3 requires application of the acquisition method for each business combination. 4 steps: • Step 1: Identifying the acquirer, • Step 2: Determining the acquisition date, • Step 3: Recognizing and measuring the identifiable assets acquired, the liabilities assumed and any non-controlling interest in the acquiree; • Step 4: Recognizing and measuring goodwill or a gain from a bargain purchase. If you’d like to learn how to consolidate, or anything about IFRS in general, please visit http://www.ifrsbox.com and subscribe to our free IFRS mini-course. Thank you!
Views: 118598 Silvia M. (of IFRSbox)
What is PURCHASE PRICE ALLOCATION? What does PURCHASE PRICE ALLOCATION mean?
 
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What is PURCHASE PRICE ALLOCATION? What does PURCHASE PRICE ALLOCATION mean? PURCHASE PRICE ALLOCATION definition - PURCHASE PRICE ALLOCATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Purchase price allocation (PPA) is an application of goodwill accounting whereby one company (the acquirer), when purchasing a second company (the target), allocates the purchase price into various assets and liabilities acquired from the transaction. In the United States, the process of conducting a PPA is typically conducted in accordance with the Financial Accounting Standards Board's ("FASB") Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 141 (revised 2007) “Business Combinations” (“SFAS 141r”) and SFAS 142 “Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets” (“SFAS 142”). Effective for financial statements issued for interim and annual periods ending after September 15, 2009, the FASB "Accounting Standards Codification" ("ASC") reorganizes the FASB statements and represents a single authoritative source of U.S. accounting and reporting standards for nongovernmental entities. The set of guidelines prescribed by SFAS 141r are generally found in ASC Topic 805. Outside the United States, the International Accounting Standards Board governs the process through the issuance of IFRS 3. Purchase price allocations are performed in conformity with the purchase method of merger and acquisition accounting. In the United States, a second method (known as the pooling or pooling-of-interests method) was discontinued after the issuance of the Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 141 “Business Combinations” (“SFAS 141”) and SFAS 142. Example: A company wishes to acquire a particular target company for a variety of reasons. After much negotiation, a purchase price of $30B is agreed upon by both sides. As of the acquisition date, the target company reported net identifiable assets of $8B on its own balance sheet. Before the target company can complete the acquisition, the target must appraise the assets and liabilities being acquired to determine their Fair Value ("FV") -- the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. The acquirer hires an appraisal firm (typically an external accounting firm or a valuation advisor) who reports that the FV of the net assets is $24B. The difference between the $8 and $24 is $16B in write-up -- the values of the net identifiable assets are in effect increased to 3 times the value reported on the original balance sheet. The difference between the $24B and $30B is $6B in goodwill acquired through the transaction—the excess of the purchase price paid over the FV of the net identifiable assets acquired. Finally, the acquirer adds both the value of the written-up assets ($24B) as well as the goodwill ($6B) onto the balance sheet, for a total of $30B in new net assets on the acquirer's balance sheet. Collectively, the process of conducting the appraisal, reporting the FV of the assets and liabilities, the allocation of the net identifiable assets from the old balance sheet price to the FV, and the determination of the goodwill in the transaction, is referred to as the PPA process. Note that a purchase price may be less than the target's balance sheet value for a variety of reasons, which can lend itself to a write-down of net assets. The process of valuing goodwill, while a component of the PPA process, is governed through goodwill accounting.
Views: 2656 The Audiopedia
Goodwill and Purchase Price Allocation
 
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Net Identifiable Assets (NIA) consists of the assets acquired from a company whose value can be measured at a given point of time and its future benefit to the company is recognizable. NIA is used for Purchase Price Allocation (PPA) and the calculation of Goodwill in Mergers and Acquisitions (M&A). Click here to learn more about this topic: https://corporatefinanceinstitute.com/resources/knowledge/valuation/net-identifiable-assets/
Purchase price allocation
 
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Purchase price allocation is an application of goodwill accounting whereby one company, when purchasing a second company, allocates the purchase price into various assets and liabilities acquired from the transaction. In the United States, the process of conducting a PPA is typically conducted in accordance with the Financial Accounting Standards Board's Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 141 “Business Combinations” and SFAS 142 “Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets”. Effective for financial statements issued for interim and annual periods ending after September 15, 2009, the FASB "Accounting Standards Codification" reorganizes the FASB statements and represents a single authoritative source of U.S. accounting and reporting standards for nongovernmental entities. The set of guidelines prescribed by SFAS 141r are generally found in ASC Topic 805. Outside the United States, the International Accounting Standards Board governs the process through the issuance of IFRS 3. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 3000 Audiopedia
IFRS 3 - Purchase Consideration I
 
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The session discusses the measurement of purchase consideration (amount paid to acquire controlling stake in a business).
Goodwill in Accounting, Defined and Explained
 
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This video defines the concept of Goodwill as used in accounting and provides an example of how Goodwill is calculated. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 72368 Edspira
Price allocation when buying a business- How to buy a business - How to sell a business
 
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Sign up to my email list at http://www.DavidCBarnett.com Learn to buy a business at http://www.BusinessBuyerAdvantage.com Related article: Greg sent me a great question; Once we have a price for the business, how do we break down that price among the different things being bought? Great question. We call this the price allocation and it’s necessary to do when you buy or sell a business as an asset sale. The way that you allocate the purchase price can have direct tax consequences for the selling entity at the time of sale... or for the buyer in the years to come after the purchase. It’s often one of the facets of the negotiation that the buyer and seller don’t realize they need to get figured out sooner rather than later. I’ve seen the price allocation cause delayed closings and has almost stopped a deal. Especially if it’s left until the last minute. Watch the video here: https://youtu.be/Zzt7xznT7fU Learn more about price allocation and how to buy businesses at www.BusinessBuyerAdvantage.com where you can access tons of information and enroll in my online course. Student satisfaction from my program is 100%. Everyone who’s taken it is happy. How do I know? It features a 30 day money-back guarantee which nobody has ever asked for. There’s no risk at all for you to enroll. You can see how my whole buyer system works in this video from a few weeks ago: https://youtu.be/ooixMSaFf6Y Please remember to like and share this article, it’s the only way the people who run the internet have of knowing if the content is any good or not. The more you share, the more likely someone who needs this information will be able to find it. Go to www.DavidCBarnett.com and sign up for my weekly e-mail. Easy unsubscribe at any time as I use MailChimp and I’m not interested in harassing people for who don’t want to hear from me. I’m coming to Toronto on May 10, 2017. Seats are already filling up. Find my current and future live events here: http://davidbarnett.eventbrite.ca . The Centre for Entrepreneur Education and Development in Halifax will be having me do two workshops in Halifax, NS on April 10. Visit http://www.CEED.ca for more info. Thanks and I’ll see you next time.
Views: 2234 David Barnett
Purchase Price Allocation Section of Merger Model
 
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Purchase Price Allocation Section of Merger Model
Views: 2555 Terry Tate
Goodwill Calculation and Impairment of Goodwill | Intermediate Accounting | CPA Exam FAR | Chp 12 p2
 
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In a business combination, the cost (purchase price) is assigned where possible to  the  identifiable  tangible  and  intangible  net  assets,  and  the  remainder  is  recorded  in  n intangible asset account called goodwill. Goodwill generated internally should not be capitalized in the  accounts—it  is  recorded  only when  an  entire  business  is  purchased. To  record  goodwill, the  fair  value  of  the  net  tangible  and  identifiable  intangible  assets  are  compared  with  the purchase  price  of  the  acquired  business.  The  difference  is  goodwill.  Goodwill  is  considered  to have  an  indefinite  life  and therefore  should  not  be  amortized. When  a  purchaser  in  a  business combination  pays  less than the fair  value  of the  identifiable  net  assets, this  is  referred to  as   bargain purchase. This excess amount is recorded as a gain by the purchaser. Impairments  15.  (L.O. 4) When the carrying amount of a longlived asset (property, plant, and equipment or intangible  assets)  is  not  recoverable,  a  write­off  of  the  impairment  is  needed.  To  determine  if  property, plant, or equipment has been impaired, a recoverability test is used. The first step of the  test,  an  estimate  of  the  future  net  cash  flows  expected  from  the  use  of  that  asset  and  its  eventual  disposition  are  determined.  If  the  sum  of  the  expected  future  net  cash  flows (undiscounted) is less than the carrying amount of the asset, an impairment has occurred. If an impairment loss has been incurred, it is the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset  exceeds  it  fair  value.  The  impairment  loss  is  reported  as  part  of  income  from  continuing operations, generally in the “Other expenses and losses” section.  16.  The  rules  that  apply  to  impairments  of  property,  plant,  and  equipment  also  apply  to limited­life  intangibles.  Indefinite­life  intangibles  other  than  goodwill  should  be  tested  for  impairment  at  least  annually  using the fair  value  test. This test  compares the fair  value  of the intangible asset with the asset’s carrying amount. If the fair value of the intangible asset is less than the  carrying  amount,  impairment  is  recognized. The  impairment  rule for  goodwill  is  a two step process. First, the fair value of the reporting unit should be compared to its carrying amount including  goodwill.  If  the  fair  value  of  the  reporting  unit  is  greater  than  the  carrying  amount,  goodwill  is  considered  not  to  be  impaired,  and  the  company  does  not  have  to  do  anything.  However, if the fair value is less than the carrying amount of the net assets, then the second step compares the fair value of the goodwill to its carrying amount and the impairment is the difference  between the carrying amount and the fair value.  Goodwill, business combination, Internally Created Goodwill, purchased goodwill, Goodwill Write-Off, indefinite life intangible, amortization, bargain purchase, CPA exam, intermediate accounting, impairment of goodwill.
Purchase price of a business allocation explained - Kim Deas Business Broker
 
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When a business is sold, the purchase price is allocated. In this video, I explain what that means and how to reduce your taxes. Learn more here. http://www.sellyourbusinessflorida.com/what-are-the-tax-ramifications-of-selling-a-business/
IFRS 3 Business Combinations - by CA Anand Banka
 
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A 1 hour summary of IFRS 3 Business Combinations by CA Anand Banka at a webcast organised by ICAI on 5th December 2014.
Views: 14459 Anand banka
IFRS UPDATE 2016 | Management's Role in Fair Value Measurement | Mark Weston
 
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Valuations Partner Mark Weston outlines management's evolving role in fair value measurement, fair value vs. value in use, purchase price allocations, impairment testing, and best practices. Subscribe NOW to Davidson & Company LLP: http://bit.ly/1qn5lCE Connect with Davidson & Company: Visit our website: http://www.davidson-co.com Like on Davidson & Company: https://Facebook.com/DavidsonAndCompany Follow on Davidson & Company: https://www.Linkedin.com/company/Davidson-&-Company-llp Davidson & Company is one of the top accounting firms in Vancouver BC Canada. Watch informative and educational videos on: taxes, audits, and everything to do with accounting. Watch what it's like to be a part of the Davidson & Company family. Don't forget to tune-in to the Ask Bahar episodes to learn more about accounting: http://bit.ly/1Wqxoh5
Views: 126 Davidson & Company
Purchase Accounting for Noncontrolling Interests AKA Minority Interests
 
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In this video, you’ll learn how to complete the purchase price allocation and Balance Sheet combination process when a buyer acquires between 50% and 100% of a seller, and how it’s different when the buyer’s stake goes from, say, 30% to 70%, compared to when it goes from 0% to 70%. By http://breakingintowallstreet.com/ "Financial Modeling Training And Career Resources For Aspiring Investment Bankers" Table of Contents: 3:31 Step 1: Transaction Assumptions 6:38 Step 2: Sources & Uses and Purchase Price Allocation 10:42 Step 3: Combining the Balance Sheets 16:57 Step 4: What Does This Look Like Under Different Scenarios? 20:11 Recap and Summary Step 1: Transaction Assumptions: Need to assume a certain existing stake, and then an additional stake acquired such that the total post-transaction stake ends up being between 50% and 100%. Assuming here that the target is public, so we also need to assume a price per share and # of shares outstanding. Relevant Numbers to Calculate: 1. What is 100% of the seller's Equity worth? We need that for Goodwill and Noncontrolling Interest calculations later on. 2. What is the buyer's current stake in the seller worth? We need this to determine what the buyer's Balance Sheet looks like before the deal happens. 3. How much is the buyer's additional stake in the seller worth. We need this to calculate the cash, debt, and stock used. 4. How much is the buyer's post-transaction stake in the seller worth? We need this to calculate the Noncontrolling Interest. Step 2: Sources & Uses and Purchase Price Allocation: Largely the same as with any other deal; the only points to be careful of are: 1. Sources and Uses should be based on the stake acquired, not 100% of the seller's value… 2. But Goodwill and PPA should be based on 100% of the seller's value! Step 3: Combining the Balance Sheets: You always combine the Balance Sheets, and the other financial statements, whenever the buyer goes from a stake under 50% to a stake over 50% in the seller. The steps to doing this are nearly the same as in any other M&A deal for 100% of another company… 1. Adjust Cash – For the cash used to fund the deal, and any cash paid for transaction / financing fees. 2. Write Up Assets – Adjust PP&E, Goodwill, Other Intangibles, and Capitalized Financing Fees. 3. Adjust Debt – Reflect new debt used to fund the deal, possible refinancing of existing debt. 4. Adjust the DTLs – Typically write off existing DTL and create a new one. 5. Adjust Shareholders' Equity – Wipe out the seller's existing Shareholders' Equity and reflect any stock issued in the deal. So… what's different? Just 2 things, really: 1. Equity Investments / Associate Companies – You have to wipe this out, if it exists, because now the buyer owns over 50% of the seller and it completely consolidates the statements instead. 2. Noncontrolling Interest – You have to create one if the buyer owns above 50% but less than 100% of the seller. Simple calculation: Value of 100% of the seller's Equity Value minus the stake the buyer owns post-transaction. Step 4: What Does This Look Like Under Different Scenarios? 0% to 70% Stake: Very straightforward - the only real difference is that a Noncontrolling Interest is created, which ensures that the Balance Sheet balances. 30% to 70% Stake: A NCI is created, just as in the case above, AND the existing Equity Investment goes away. 30% to 100% Stake: No NCI is created, but the existing Equity Investment goes away. 0% to 100% Stake: No NCI is created and there is no existing Equity Investment; just a normal M&A deal then. Cash vs. Stock vs. Debt Mix: Doesn't matter for the NCI or Equity Investment or Goodwill treatment at all – only impacts the adjustments to cash, debt, and stock on both sides of the Balance Sheet. RESOURCES: http://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/108-07-Purchase-Accounting-NCI.xlsx http://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/108-07-Purchase-Accounting-NCI.pdf
Earnout Modeling in M&A Deals and Merger Models
 
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In this tutorial, you’ll learn how and why earn-outs are used in M&A deals, how they appear on the 3 financial statements, and how they impact the transaction assumptions and combined financial statements in a merger model. By http://breakingintowallstreet.com/ "Financial Modeling Training And Career Resources For Aspiring Investment Bankers" Table of Contents: 1:28 What Earn-Outs Are and Why You Use Them 7:46 How Earn-Outs Show Up on the 3 Statements 12:21 How Earn-Outs Impact Purchase Price Allocation and Sources & Uses 16:02 How Earn-Outs Affect the IS, BS, and CFS in a Merger Model 19:12 Recap and Summary What Earn-Outs Are and Why You Use Them Instead of paying for a company 100% upfront, the buyer offers to pay some portion of the price later on – *if certain conditions are met.* Example: “We’ll pay you $100 million for your company now, and if you achieve EBITDA of $20 million in 2 years, we’ll pay you an additional $50 million then.” Earn-outs are VERY common for private company / start-up acquisitions in tech, biotech, pharmaceuticals, and related “high-risk industries.” EA acquired PopCap for $750 million upfront, and offered an earn-out that varied based on PopCap Games’ cumulative EBIT over the next 2 years. The schedule was as follows: 2-Year Earnings Under $91 Million: Nothing 2-Year Earnings Above $110 Million: $100 million 2-Year Earnings Above $200 Million: $175 million 2-Year Earnings Above $343 Million: $550 million Why Use an Earn-Out? You see them most often when the buyer and the seller disagree on the seller’s value or expected financial performance in the future. Earn-outs are a way for the buyer and seller to compromise and say, “We don’t really know how we’ll perform in the future, but if we reach a target of $X in revenue or EBITDA, you’ll pay us more for our company.” The buyer will almost always want to base the earn-out on the seller’s standalone Net Income, while the seller prefers to base it on revenue, partially so the seller can spend a silly amount to reach these revenue targets. As a compromise, EBIT or EBITDA are sometimes used. How Earn-Outs Show Up on the 3 Statements Balance Sheet: Earn-Outs are recorded as “Contingent Consideration,” a Liability on the L&E side. Income Statement: You record changes in the value of the Contingent Consideration here, i.e. if the probability of paying out the earn-out changes, you show it as a Loss or Gain here. It’s a Loss if the probability of paying the earn-out increases, and a Gain if the probability decreases. Cash Flow Statement: When the earn-out is paid out in cash to the seller, it’s a cash outflow here. You also have to add back or subtract changes in the Contingent Consideration value here, reversing what is listed on the Income Statement. How Earn-Outs Impact Purchase Price Allocation and Sources & Uses Earn-outs do not affect the Sources & Uses schedule for the initial transaction since no cash is paid out yet. Earn-outs *increase* the amount of Goodwill created in an M&A deal because they boost the Liabilities side of the Balance Sheet, which, in turn, requires higher Goodwill on the Assets side to balance it. How Earn-Outs Affect the IS, BS, and CFS in a Merger Model You tend to leave the Income Statement impact blank in a merger model unless you have detailed estimates for the seller’s future performance. You SHOULD factor in the cash payout of the earn-out on the combined Cash Flow Statement – you can assume a 100% chance of payout, or some lower probability. The payout will appear in Cash Flow from Financing and reduce cash flow and the company’s cash balance. RESOURCES: http://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/108-08-Earnout-Modeling.pdf http://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/108-08-JAZZ-Earnouts.pdf http://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/108-08-EA-PopCap.pdf http://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/108-08-EA-PopCap-2.pdf http://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/108-08-Earnout-Article-MA-Journal.pdf
Negative Goodwill and Bargain Purchases in Merger Models
 
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In this tutorial, you’ll learn about bargain purchases, the concept of “negative Goodwill,” and what happens on the financial statements in a merger model when a buyer acquires a seller for an Equity Purchase Price less than the seller’s Common Shareholders’ Equity. https://breakingintowallstreet.com/ "Financial Modeling Training And Career Resources For Aspiring Investment Bankers" Table of Contents: 4:20 Part 1: Why Bargain Purchases Take Place 9:17 Part 2: Why the Accounting is Confusing, and a Simpler Method 12:30 Part 3: Real-Life Example of a Bargain Purchase 14:19 Recap and Summary Resources: https://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/108-13-Negative-Goodwill-Bargain-Purchases-Slides.pdf https://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/108-13-Negative-Goodwill-Bargain-Purchases.xlsx https://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/108-13-Negative-Goodwill-Westamerica-County-Bank.pdf QUESTION: “Can you explain what happens in an M&A deal if the Equity Purchase Price is less than the seller’s Common Shareholders’ Equity?” “Do you get ‘negative’ Goodwill? What is the accounting treatment for this type of bargain purchase?” SHORT ANSWER: No, you never create “negative Goodwill” because it cannot exist under either IFRS or U.S. GAAP. Instead, you take the absolute value of the Goodwill created and record it as an Extraordinary Gain on the Income Statement. You have to put a MAX(0 around the Goodwill calculation to do this. You reverse the Gain on the CFS and reverse the extra taxes the company paid on the Gain. On the Balance Sheet, Cash, Retained Earnings, and the DTL or DTA will be affected by these changes. Part 1: Why Bargain Purchases? Bargain purchases are most common for distressed sellers, when the company is running out of Cash, has high Debt and other obligations, and needs to sell or liquidate quickly. A buyer who likes the seller’s intangibles or other aspects of it might come in and offer a better-than-liquidation price that is still less than the seller’s Common Shareholders’ Equity. In our example here, Starbucks likes Coco Cream Donuts’ brand, customer list, and intellectual property, but doesn’t believe its Tangible Assets are worth all that much, so it allocates 60% of the Equity Purchase Price to those Intangibles. In the purchase price allocation process, it writes off the seller’s Common Shareholders’ Equity and Goodwill, adjusts its PP&E and Intangibles, and creates a new DTL. Instead of recording negative $203 million of Goodwill, it records 0 and shows an Extraordinary Gain of $203 million on the combined Income Statement instead. Part 2: Accounting Confusion, and a Simpler Method Under the old method, you allocated the negative Goodwill proportionally to the acquired company’s Assets until there was nothing left – and if some amount remained, you recorded that amount as an Extraordinary Gain. However, you no longer do this under U.S. GAAP or IFRS, and the rules changed a long time ago. You just record the Gain now. A simpler method for doing this is to simply Credit the Gain to the combined Shareholders’ Equity in the Balance Sheet adjustments – the Balance Sheet will balance immediately after the deal takes place, and the setup is much simpler and easier to explain. Part 3: Real-Life Example Back in 2009, Westamerica Bancorporation paid almost nothing for Country Bank, even though its Net Assets were $48 million. The company recorded a Gain on Acquisition of $48 million on its Income Statement, reversed it on the Cash Flow Statement, and reversed the taxes on this Gain as well. These types of deals were common in the last financial crisis because there were so many distressed sellers that desperately needed to sell.
Expenses Classification IFRS
 
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We may came across financial statements which are prepared under different GAAPs and the presentation of the financial statements Differs based on the GAAP followed by the entity. Here I have summarised some key differences in the GAAPs relating to presentation of financial statements. 1. Function or by Nature Expenses may be classified as Function or by Nature. For example Cost of Sales, Administrative expenses, Selling and Distribution expenses are various functions within the entity and grouping of expenditures based on this can be made which is termed as “Expenses By Function”. On the other hand expenses can be disclosed as based on Nature i.e Depreciation expenses, Salaries, Purchases, Other expenses etc. So below are some key differences that exist in major GAAPs. IFRS 1. Under IFRS expenses can be presented in the FS as either Function or by Nature whichever gives more relevant information to the users of financial statements , including the industry factors and the nature of business in which the entity is engaged. However an entity presenting expenses based on Function need to provide additional disclosures by nature and specifically for Depreciation expenses (Amortisation) and employee benefit expenses. 2. Entities are not allowed to mix functional and nature classification of expenses. (Only one is allowed) US GAAP 1. SEC requires the entities to present the financials only on the basis of function. However depreciation expenses may be presented separately in the financial statement, provided the entity should include the suffix “ Exclusive of Depreciation” in the Cost of sales line items and they are not allowed to disclose Gross profit. Ind AS 1. IND AS prohibits the usage of disclosure by function and they only allowed the disclosure by nature for expenses. However disclosure by function can be provided as a separate in the notes to the financial statements.
Views: 134 ShootFor Knowledge
Accounting for Business Combinations - The Consolidation Process
 
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This video/channel has no affiliation/endorsement from UTS. Covers the consolidation process: - Recording Acquisition - Elimination of parent Investment - Goodwill/Bargain purchase acquisition analysis - Goodwill Impairment - Ex/Cum dividend for consolidation - Changes to pre-acquisition equity
Views: 2601 Ben's Business Videos
How to Calculate Goodwill in M&A Deals and Merger Models
 
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In this tutorial, you’ll learn why Goodwill exists and how to calculate Goodwill in M&A deals and merger models – both simple and more complex/realistic scenarios. https://breakingintowallstreet.com/ "Financial Modeling Training And Career Resources For Aspiring Investment Bankers" Resources: https://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/108-14-How-to-Calculate-Goodwill-Slides.pdf https://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/108-14-How-to-Calculate-Goodwill.xlsx Table of Contents: 1:21 Goodwill – Why It Exists and Simple Calculation 6:59 More Realistic Goodwill Calculation 11:47 How to Determine the Percentages in Real Life and Added Complexities 16:07 Recap and Summary Lesson Outline: Goodwill is an accounting construct that exists because Buyers often pay more than the Common Shareholders’ Equity on Seller’s Balance Sheets when acquiring them in M&A deals, which causes the Combined Balance Sheet to go out of balance. By creating Goodwill, we ensure that Assets = Liabilities + Equity. For example, if a Buyer pays $1000 for a Seller, and the Seller has $1500 in Assets, $600 in Liabilities, and $900 in Equity, the Balance Sheet will go out of balance immediately after the deal. If the Buyer spends $1000 in Cash, its Assets side will increase by $500 total ($1500 increase in Assets from the Seller, and $1000 decrease from the Cash usage), and its L&E side will increase by $600 due to the Seller’s Liabilities. Therefore, the Balance Sheet is out of balance by $100, and we fix it by creating $100 of Goodwill on the Assets side. The basic calculation is: Goodwill = Equity Purchase Price – Seller’s Common Shareholders’ Equity + Seller’s Existing Goodwill +/- Other Adjustments to Seller’s Balance Sheet We normally create two Assets to deal with this problem – Other Intangible Assets for specific, identifiable items that have value, such as patents, trademarks, and customer relationships – and Goodwill, which is the “plug” for everything else that ensures balancing. How to Calculate Goodwill in More Detail In all M&A deals, under both IFRS and U.S. GAAP, Buyers are required to re-value everything on the Seller’s Balance Sheet. So, if the Seller’s factories, land, inventory, etc. are worth more or less than their Balance Sheet values, they must be adjusted – and those adjustments will also factor into the Goodwill calculation. Many items that represent timing differences – Deferred Rent, Deferred Tax Liabilities/Assets, etc. – also go away because these temporary differences are reversed and reconciled in M&A deals. Finally, a new Deferred Tax Liability (and sometimes other new items) often gets created in the deal (see our separate video on this one). A real Goodwill calculation might look more like this: Goodwill = Equity Purchase Price – Seller’s Common Shareholders’ Equity + Seller’s Existing Goodwill – Asset Write-Ups + Asset Write-Downs – Liability Write-Downs + Liability Write-Ups If an item increases Assets or reduces L&E, that means less Goodwill is needed to boost Assets – so we subtract that item (this explains why we subtract Asset Write-Ups as well as Liability Write-Downs such as DTLs that get eliminated). To determine the percentages for these write-ups, you could look at the percentages allocated to similar companies that were acquired in this market recently. For example, if we’re acquiring a high-growth software company, we might look at a deal like Atlassian’s $384 million acquisition of Trello and use the percentages allocated to Other Intangibles and the other line items there as a reference. We could use the percentage allocated to Goodwill to check our work at the end as well. Added Complexities in Real-Life Calculating Goodwill in real life gets even more complex because you must deal with items such as Deferred Rent and Deferred Revenue and their possible elimination or write-down, as well as inter-company receivables and payables. Also, the Deferred Tax line items work differently in different deal types (Stock vs. Asset vs. 338(h)(10)). There are different categories of Intangibles, such as Definite vs. Indefinite-Lived ones, and there are also industry-specific items such as In-Place Lease Value and Above/Below-Market Leases in real estate. And don’t forget about Earn-Outs and other Contingent Payments – they show up on the Balance Sheet and also affect Goodwill. All these items follow the same rules; it’s just that you calculate them a bit differently for use in the Goodwill calculation itself.
Intangible Assets Accounting (Goodwill Impairment Loss, Testing, Calculating & Recording)
 
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Accounting for goodwill impairment, goodwill is the excess of purchase cost over fair value of net assets received in the purchase of a company, (price paid - fair value of net assets = goodwill), Recording Goodwill, 1-Goodwill is the excess of purchase cost over fair value, 2-Internally generated Goodwill should not be capitalized, 3-Purchased Goodwill is recorded only when an entire business is purchased, 4-Goodwill is not amortized, must be tested annually for impairement and written-down if it has decreased in value and recognized as an expense on balance sheet, 5-Adjust Goodwill carrying value only when impaired, Impairement of Goodwill is a two-step process: Step-1: First compare the fair value of the reporting unit to its carrying amount including goodwill: a. If the fair value exceeds the carrying amount of the net assets (inculding goodwill) goodwill is not impaired, b. If fair value were less than the carrying amount of net assets + GW then perform a second step to determine impairment, Step-2: Fair value reporting unit compare less Net idenfiable assets (excluding GW) equals Implied value of Goodwill, Implied value of Goodwill minus Carrying amount of Goodwill equals Loss on impairment, detailed example by Allen Mursau
Views: 24097 Allen Mursau
Intangible Assets Accounting (Bargain Purchase Of A Business, Price Paid Less Than Fair Value)
 
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Accounting for a bargain purchase of a business where one company acquires another company (example would be forced liquidation or distressed sale of a business), Bargain Purchase: 1-Purchaser in business combination pays less than the fair value of identifiable net assets, 2-Purchase price less than value of net identifiable net assets, this excess amount is recorded as a gain by the purchaser, if the price paid is less than the fair value of net assets received (assets - liabilities) then a gain is recognized, detailed example by Allen Mursau
Views: 4791 Allen Mursau
Why Deferred Tax Liabilities Get Created in an M&A Deal
 
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Why Do Deferred Tax Liabilities Matter? They're part of any M&A deal. By http://breakingintowallstreet.com/biws/ You'll find you always see them in the purchase price allocation schedule, and they impact the combined company's taxes after the deal takes place. You see them all the time, especially for highly acquisitive companies like Oracle. They reflect the fact that there are TIMING differences between when a company records taxes on its publicly filed Income Statement and when it actually pays those taxes. Specifically, when a buyer writes up the seller's PP&E or Other Intangible Assets in a deal, the buyer depreciates or amortizes them over time... but only on the BOOK version of its statements! It can't do that on the TAX version of its statements it files when paying taxes to the government, which means that the actual amount of cash taxes it pays will be different from what's on its Income Statement. Here's the Easiest Way to Think About DTLs: Instead of thinking about the company's historical situation or its taxable income, think about its FUTURE TAXES. If future cash taxes exceed future book taxes, a DTL will be created. We need to pay ADDITIONAL taxes for items that are not truly tax-deductible. If future cash taxes are less than future book taxes, a DTA will be created. We will pay LESS in taxes than the company's book Income Statement implies. As the book and cash tax payments equalize over time, the DTL or DTA goes away. Two Most Common Questions on DTLs: "Wait a minute - why does a DTL get created immediately? Isn't it caused by the book and cash taxes being different many times historically?" Nope, not necessarily - that CAN be a cause, but DTLs/DTAs can also be created by events that change the company's FUTURE tax situation. So you need to think about how taxes will change in the future, not how they've changed in the past, to determine this. "Wait a minute, the taxable income for book purposes is LOWER than it is for tax purposes - doesn't that create a Deferred Tax ASSET (DTA) instead?" Nope. The relevant question is not how the taxable income differs, but how the FUTURE TAXES will differ. If the company will pay more in cash taxes than book taxes in the FUTURE, as a result of these write-ups, or any other changes, then a DTL gets created.
Accounting for Leases: Bargain Purchase Option (New FASB Rules) Intermediate Accounting|CPA Exam FAR
 
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Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/accountinglectures Visit the website where you can search using a specific term: https://www.farhatlectures.com/ Connect with LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mansour-farhat-cpa-cia-cfe-macc-2453423a/ Executory costs are normal expenses associated with owning a leased asset, such as property insurance and property taxes. The accounting for executory costs depends on how the lease is structured, that is, whether the lease is a gross lease or a net lease. In a gross lease, the payments to the lessor are fixed as part of the rental payments in the contract. In a net lease, the lessee makes variable payments to a third party or to the lessor directly for the executory costs. Illustration 21A.29 provides examples of these two situations. Lease Prepayments and Incentives For all leases at the commencement date, the lease liability is the starting point to determine the amount to record for the right-of-use asset. Companies adjust the right-of-use asset for any lease prepayments, lease incentives, and initial direct costs made prior to or at the commencement date. These adjustments determine the amount to report as the right-of-use asset at the lease commencement date as follows. 1.Lease prepayments made by the lessee increase the right-of-use asset. 2.Lease incentive payments made by the lessor to the lessee reduce the right-of-use asset. 3.Initial direct costs incurred by the lessee (discussed in the next section) increase the right-of-use asset. Initial Direct Costs Initial direct costs are incremental costs of a lease that would not have been incurred had the lease not been executed. [16] Costs directly or indirectly attributable to negotiating and arranging the lease (e.g., external legal costs to draft or negotiate a lease or an allocation of internal legal costs) are not considered initial direct costs. For lessors, initial direct costs often are more significant because they are usually the party that solicits lessees as part of their sales activities. As a result, lessors often engage attorneys to prepare the legal documents, as well as pay commissions incurred in connection with the execution of a lease. Lessor accounting for initial direct costs depends on the type of lease. [17] •For operating leases, a lessor defers the initial direct costs and amortizes them as expenses over the term of the lease. •For sales-type leases, the lessor expenses initial direct costs at lease commencement (in the period in which it recognizes the profit on the sale). An exception is when there is no selling profit or loss on the transaction. If there is no selling profit or loss, the initial direct costs are deferred and recognized over the lease term. Lessors commonly also incur internal costs related to leasing activities. Examples are activities the lessor performs for advertising, servicing existing leases, and establishing and monitoring credit policies, as well as the costs for supervision and administration or for expenses such as rent and depreciation. Internal direct costs should not be included in initial direct costs. Such costs would have been incurred regardless of whether a lease was executed. As a result, internal direct costs are generally expensed as incurred. Bargain Purchase Options Short-Term Leases A short-term lease is a lease that, at the commencement date, has a lease term of 12 months or less. Rather than recording a right-of-use asset and lease liability, lessees may elect to expense the lease payments as incurred. Leases may include options to either extend the term of the lease (a renewal option) or to terminate the lease prior to the contractually defined lease expiration date (a termination option). In these situations, renewal or termination options that are reasonably certain of exercise by the lessee are included in the lease term. Therefore, a one-year lease with a renewal option that the lessee is reasonably certain to exercise is not a short-term lease. Disclosure Lessees and lessors must also provide additional qualitative and quantitative disclosures to help financial statement users assess the amount, timing, and uncertainty of future cash flows. These disclosures are intended to supplement the amounts provided in the financial statements. Qualitative disclosures to be provided by both lessees and lessors are summarized in Illustration 21A.36. [19] •Nature of its leases, including general description of those leases. •How variable lease payments are determined. •Existence and terms and conditions for options to extend or terminate the lease and for residual value guarantees. •Information about significant assumptions and judgments (e.g., discount rates). quantitative information that should be disclosed for the lessee. •Total lease cost. •Finance lease cost, segregated between the amortization of the right-of-use assets and interest on the lease liabilities. •Operating and short-term lease cost.
Intangible Assets Accounting (Research & Development, R&D Whats Included, Accounting Treatment)
 
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Accounting for research and development (R&D), whats included and accounting treatment, R&D costs are not themselves intangible assets, they often result in the development of patents or copyrights (new products, processes, ideas, etc.) that provide future value that are intangible assets, Costs associated with R&D activities & accounting treatment:1-Materials, Equipment & Facilities R&D: Expense entire cost unless the items have alternative future uses, if there are alternative future uses, carry items as inventory & allocate as consumed or capitalize & depreciate as used to R&D expense, 2- Personnel: Expense as incurred salaries, wages, and other related costs of personnel engaged in R&D, 3- Purchased Intangibles: Recognize & measure at fair value, account for in accordance with their use (either limited life or indefinite life intangibles), 4-Contract Services: Expense the costs of services performed by others in connection with R&D incurred, 5-Indirect Costs: Include reasonable allocation of indirect costs in R&D costs, except for general & administrative cost, which must be clearly related to R&D inorder to be included in R&D, discussion by Allen Mursau
Views: 14182 Allen Mursau
Non Controlling Interest| Goodwill Computation | Advanced Accounting | CPA Exam FAR | Consolidation
 
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This video cover CPA questions covering hot to compute during the financial statements consolation non controlling interest (NCI) and goodwill. This topic is covered in advanced accounting course. My website: https://farhatlectures.com/ Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/accountinglectures LinkedIn: https://goo.gl/Pp2ter Twitter: https://twitter.com/farhatlectures Email Contact: [email protected]
Gains and losses on pre-existing relationships in a business combination
 
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Learn more at PwC.com - http://pwc.to/2kR7rtC Pre-existing relationships are relatively common in business combinations, and can result in gains and losses on the transaction. Watch PwC's Becky Bisesar explain the guidance associated with gains and losses on pre-existing relationships (specifically the important difference between contractual and non-contractual relationships) and share a few examples to put them in context.
Views: 521 PwC US
16 Advanced Accounting: Income Taxes in Business Combinations
 
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In this lesson we discuss how income taxes impact the acquisition accounting. For more information on this subject and other finance topics, visit our website www.FinanceLearningAcademy.com (Video 16 of 20)
Views: 4065 Executive Finance
GS Value Adjustments Depreciable Assets Video 1
 
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Consolidations Value adjustments Depreciable PPE Presented by C Janse van Rensburg
Views: 3009 IFRS Rookies
Asset and Stock Acquisition Method of Payment | Advanced Accounting | CPA Exam FAR | Ch 1 P 2
 
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asset acquisition, stock acquisition, mergers, consolidations, acquisitions, consolidated financial statements, acquirer, acquiree, Investment in Subsidiary, statutory merger, statutory consolidation, advanced accounting, CPA exam, Takeover Premiums, Earnout, stock exchanged ratio, goodwill, normal earnings, excess earnings. estimated goodwill, offering price, implied offering price, dilution, accretion
Goodwill explained
 
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What is goodwill? How to calculate goodwill? We will discuss the definition of the finance and accounting term goodwill, and go through an example of goodwill by discussing one of the largest technology acquisitions in recent history: the acquisition of social network Linked In by Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT). We will review the calculation of goodwill for that headline-grabbing deal, which is a great example of how to record goodwill on the balance sheet. For some companies, goodwill is in the top 3 of largest categories of assets on their balance sheet. If you want to make sense of a company’s financial statements, then a basic understanding of the concept of goodwill is invaluable. Goodwill is the excess of the purchase price paid for an acquired firm, over the fair value of its separately identifiable net assets. A definition of goodwill in simpler terms: goodwill is the difference between what a company pays to buy an acquisition target, and what that acquired company is worth “on paper”. Goodwill is recognized only in a business combination, and goodwill is not amortized. Why would any acquiring company pay a premium for an acquisition target above what that company’s net assets are worth? Goodwill reflects the perceived superior earnings capacity of the business combination. Companies have to perform an annual impairment test to both goodwill and intangible assets. What that impairment test does is basically to assess whether the carrying value of goodwill and intangible assets is recoverable. In simple terms: if the financial results and future prospects of the business you acquired are dramatically dropping, you need to write off all or part of the goodwill and intangible assets. Philip de Vroe (The Finance Storyteller) aims to make strategy, finance and leadership enjoyable and easier to understand. Learn the business vocabulary to join the conversation with your CEO at your company. Understand how financial statements work in order to make better stock market investment decisions. Philip delivers training in various formats: YouTube videos, classroom sessions, webinars, and business simulations. Connect with me through Linked In!
Contingent consideration in business combinations
 
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Learn more at PwC.com - http://pwc.to/28SF9Ym In certain circumstances, contingent consideration in a business combination (e.g. an earn out) can be considered compensation expense in the post combination period. PwC’s Meg Rohas explains the basic concepts around contingent payments, the criteria to consider when things aren’t clear cut, and one area that can catch people off guard.
Views: 1972 PwC US
Interest Capitalization | Self-Constructed Assets | Intermediate Accounting| CPA Exam FAR | Chp10 p2
 
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When machinery and equipment to be used by an entity are  constructed  rather than purchased, a problem exists concerning the allocation of overhead costs. These costs may be handled in one of two ways: (a) assign no fixed overhead to the cost of the constructed asset,  or (b) assign a portion of all overhead to the construction process. The second method called a full ­costing  approach  appears  preferable  because  of  its  consistency  with  the  historical  cost  principle. It should be noted that the cost recorded for a constructed asset can never exceed the price charged by an outside produce.  Capitalization  of  interest  cost  incurred  in  connection  with  financing  the construction  or  acquisition  of  property,  plant,  and  equipment  generally  follows  the  rule  of capitalizing  only  the  actual  interest  costs  incurred  during  construction.  While  some modification  to  this  general  rule  occurs,  its  adoption  is  consistent  with  the  concept  that  the historical cost of acquiring an asset includes all costs incurred to bring the asset to the condition and location necessary for its intended use. To qualify for interest capitalization, assets must require a period of time to get them ready for  their  intended  use.  Assets  that  qualify  for  interest  cost  capitalization  include  assets  under construction for an enterprise’s own use  such as buildings, plants, and machinery) and assets intended for  sale  or  lease that  are  constructed  or  otherwise  produced  as  discrete  projects  (like ships or real estate developments). The period during which interest must be capitalized begins when three conditions are present: (a) expenditures for the asset have been made; (b) activities  that are necessary to get the asset ready for its intended use are in progress; and (c) interest cost is being incurred. The  amount  of  interest  to  capitalize  is  limited  to  the  lower  of  (a)  actual  interest  cost incurred  during  the  period  or  (b)  the  amount  of  interest  cost  incurred  during  the  period  that  theoretically  could  have  been  avoided  if  the  expenditure  for  the  asset  had  not  been  made (avoidable  interest).  The  potential  amount  of  interest  that  may  be  capitalized  during  an accounting period is determined by multiplying interest rate(s) by the weighted­ average amount of accumulated expenditures for qualifying assets during the period.  12.  Examples  which  demonstrate  computation  of  the  weighted ­average  accumulated expenditures  and  selecting  the  appropriate  interest  rate  are  included  in  the  chapter.  Also,  a  comprehensive illustration of interest capitalization is shown in the text. This illustration includes both the computations and the related journal entries that should be made in a situation when an  asset is constructed and capitalizable interest is a part of the transaction.   Two special issues relate to interest capitalization. If a company purchases land as a site for a structure, interest costs capitalized during the period of construction are part of the cost of the plant, not the land. In addition, companies should generally not net or offset interest revenue against interest cost.  Interest capitalization, self constructed asset, GAAP, non current assets, plan assets,. fixed assets, Plant assets, property plant and equipment, PP&E, fixed assets, depreciation expense, accumulated depreciation, gain on disposal of plant assets, acquisition cost, land improvement, salvage value, residual value, useful life, straight line method, units of production, double declining balances, MACRS, ACRS, book value, carrying value,
Example: Goodwill Impairment | Intermediate Accounting | CPA Exam FAR | Chp 12 p 3
 
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In a business combination, the cost (purchase price) is assigned where possible to  the  identifiable  tangible  and  intangible  net  assets,  and  the  remainder  is  recorded  in  n intangible asset account called goodwill. Goodwill generated internally should not be capitalized in the  accounts—it  is  recorded  only when  an  entire  business  is  purchased. To  record  goodwill, the  fair  value  of  the  net  tangible  and  identifiable  intangible  assets  are  compared  with  the purchase  price  of  the  acquired  business.  The  difference  is  goodwill.  Goodwill  is  considered  to have  an  indefinite  life  and therefore  should  not  be  amortized. When  a  purchaser  in  a  business combination  pays  less than the fair  value  of the  identifiable  net  assets, this  is  referred to  as   bargain purchase. This excess amount is recorded as a gain by the purchaser. Impairments  15.  (L.O. 4) When the carrying amount of a longlived asset (property, plant, and equipment or intangible  assets)  is  not  recoverable,  a  write­off  of  the  impairment  is  needed.  To  determine  if  property, plant, or equipment has been impaired, a recoverability test is used. The first step of the  test,  an  estimate  of  the  future  net  cash  flows  expected  from  the  use  of  that  asset  and  its  eventual  disposition  are  determined.  If  the  sum  of  the  expected  future  net  cash  flows (undiscounted) is less than the carrying amount of the asset, an impairment has occurred. If an impairment loss has been incurred, it is the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset  exceeds  it  fair  value.  The  impairment  loss  is  reported  as  part  of  income  from  continuing operations, generally in the “Other expenses and losses” section.  16.  The  rules  that  apply  to  impairments  of  property,  plant,  and  equipment  also  apply  to limited­life  intangibles.  Indefinite­life  intangibles  other  than  goodwill  should  be  tested  for  impairment  at  least  annually  using the fair  value  test. This test  compares the fair  value  of the intangible asset with the asset’s carrying amount. If the fair value of the intangible asset is less than the  carrying  amount,  impairment  is  recognized. The  impairment  rule for  goodwill  is  a two step process. First, the fair value of the reporting unit should be compared to its carrying amount including  goodwill.  If  the  fair  value  of  the  reporting  unit  is  greater  than  the  carrying  amount,  goodwill  is  considered  not  to  be  impaired,  and  the  company  does  not  have  to  do  anything.  However, if the fair value is less than the carrying amount of the net assets, then the second step compares the fair value of the goodwill to its carrying amount and the impairment is the difference  between the carrying amount and the fair value.  Goodwill, business combination, Internally Created Goodwill, purchased goodwill, Goodwill Write-Off, indefinite life intangible, amortization, bargain purchase, CPA exam, intermediate accounting, impairment of goodwill. Goodwill, business combination, Internally Created Goodwill, purchased goodwill, Goodwill Write-Off, indefinite life intangible, amortization, bargain purchase, CPA exam, intermediate accounting, impairment of goodwill
IFRS 17: What are the measurement essentials for insurance contracts? [Part 2 of 2]
 
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In July 2017, IFRS® Foundation staff recorded a webinar on the requirements in IFRS 17 Insurance Contracts. The two-part webinar gives an overview of the core measurement requirements for insurance contracts. The first part discusses initial recognition and the second part discusses the subsequent measurement. The webinar is part of an International Accounting Standards Board series supporting the implementation of IFRS 17.
Views: 3226 IFRS Foundation
What Is The Meaning Of Acquisition In Accounting?
 
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Meaning, pronunciation definition of acquisition accounting procedure adopted in preparation the consolidated financial statement an acquiring and acquired firm accountingrelated to negative goodwill(accounting & book keeping) dictionary by free online english encyclopedia. Acquisition method of accounting accountingtools. Collins english what is acquisition accounting? Definition and meaning accounting definition of by the financial dictionarydefine at dictionary in oxford dictionaries. In the united states, a second in private company, goodwill has no predetermined value prior to acquisition; Its magnitude depends on two other mergers and acquisitions (m&a) are transactions which ownership of companies, parties should also consider their accounting treatment m&a transaction this means that synergy can be obtained through many forms such as; Increased market share, cost savings exploring new opportunities for reverse have always constituted an interesting topic or event analysed by applying definition. Acquisition accounting investopedia with acquisition the fair market value of acquired firm is combinations to be treated as acquisitions for purposes, meaning that one are often made part a company's growth strategy whereby it more issues weaken takeover financial position, this isn't always case, but has proven an effective means definition procedure in which assets company recently been taken. What is an acquisition in accounting? Youtube. What is acquisition accounting sec closes the gaap definition at dictionary, a free online with pronunciation, synonyms and translationa procedure in which value of asset meaning, example sentences, more from oxford dictionaries 4 may 2017 when an acquiree buys another company acquirer uses gaap, must record event using method 18acquisition noun full consolidation, where assets subsidiary has been purchased are included parent company's date on purchase commits to buying effectively takes control seller definition, english dictionary, synonym, see also 'acquisitive',acquisitiveness',acquit',acquisitively', reverso goodwill construct that required under generally if acquired net fall value, acquiring write them down 23 jul 2013 capital, defined as capital used acquire other assets, needed business decides grow critical step determining appropriate approach be set liabilities meets business, ifrs 3 price allocation (ppa) application whereby one allocations performed conformity merger. Acquisition accounting investopediaacquisition definition and meaning. Acquisition accounting? Definition and meaning what is acquisition date? investor wordsenglish definition dictionary goodwill & example capital the strategic cfo. Distinguishing between a business combination and bdo globalgoodwill (accounting) wikipediaaccounting for reverse acquisition (part1) accounting.
Views: 110 Bet My Bet
Pharmaceuticals | Can you leverage from a purchase price allocation for transfer pricing purposes?
 
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A considerable amount of discussion is generated regarding the implications of a purchase price allocation for transfer pricing purposes. As such this third web event will address the following question: Can you leverage from a purchase price allocation for transfer pricing purposes? Following an acquisition the purchase price paid must be allocated to all identifiable assets and liabilities assumed, following a set of accounting rules outlined within IFRS 3 and IAS 38. Does the identification criteria outlined in IAS 38 meet the definition of intangibles for transfer pricing purposes? What is really included in the "left over" that is usually referred to as "goodwill" and how valuable can this "goodwill" be for pharmaceutical companies? Is it possible to bridge the gap between PPAs based on accounting rules versus tax/transfer pricing treatment and mitigate the effect on the future transfer pricing model that will result from the accounting treatment of goodwill? How to manage the risk of running a high effective tax rates? The web event will address the following: - Overview of the reporting rules currently in place; - How to bridge the gap between PPAs for reporting purposes versus the relevant tax/transfer pricing treatment, what are the similarities and differences; - How important is "goodwill" for pharmaceutical companies. At the end of the web event, you will: - Recognize to what extent acquisition accounting for financial reporting purposes can be used for tax/transfer pricing purposes; - How to mitigate the effect on the future transfer pricing model that will result from the accounting treatment of goodwill. Speaker(s): - Yariv Ben-Dov, Founding Partner, Bar-Zvi & Ben-Dov Law Offices Yariv Ben-Dov is the founding partner of Bar-Zvi & Ben-Dov Law Offices. Yariv has successfully managed transfer pricing assessments and tax due diligence for M&A, transfer pricing planning, documentation, and audits, all over the globe, for a number of international conglomerates in various fields of industries. http://http://www.bbl.co.il - Igor Soroka, Senior Manager, Richter Igor Soroka is a Senior Manager who has worked in the Transfer Pricing field since 2006. Igor has been involved in preparing transfer pricing documentation and providing audit defense support to various clients in Pharmaceutical, Apparel, Information Technology and other industries. http://www.richter.ca - Ioanna Ninou, Associate, Transfer Pricing Associates Ioanna Ninou graduated from the Rotterdam School of Management Erasmus University and is a valuation and transfer pricing specialist at Transfer Pricing Associates. http://www.tpa-global.com
Views: 683 MyTPAGlobal
What Is An Acquisition In Accounting?
 
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What are acquisition costs in purchase accounting? Simple studiesaccounting for reverse (part1) accounting and mergers & acquisitions a snapshot change the way you pwc. Such business combinations are accounted for using the 'acquisition method', which generally requires assets acquired and accounting mergers acquisitions can be daunting, but it all starts with a basic understanding of purchase versus acquisition. What is acquisition accounting? Definition and meaning what are acquisitions mergers in Top accounting. 28 nov 2011 the world of business includes such activities as mergers and acquisitions. The importance of this topic in our 14 dec 2011 stay ahead the accounting and reporting standards for m&a1 determining whether an acquired group assets is a business has proven goodwill intangible asset that arises when buyer acquires existing journal entry books company to record acquisition b would be dr $11 accounts receivable $10 What accounting? Definition meaning what are acquisitions mergers Top. Googleusercontent search. Acquisition accounting investopediaacquisition investopedia. Asp url? Q webcache. Acquisition accounting investopedia a acquisition. An acquisition or merger). Acquisition accounting definition of acquisition by the and meaning. Read more this article explains the basic principles relating to accounting for mergers and acquisitions. Acquisition accounting investopedia. In a simplified way, this means companies buy other profit and loss account only from the date of acquisition; And difference between fair value consideration (and any deferred consideration) accounting for reverse acquisitions have always constituted an interesting topic accountants both in theory practice. Philosophically, the purchase method accounted for an acquisition as sum of assets and liabilities being acquired 14 jan 2013 in brief, a business acquisition, from accounting standpoint, is transaction which both acquiring company are still left 1 jul 2010. For example, if acquisition accountingrelated to accounting negative goodwill(accounting & book keeping) definition an procedure in which the assets of a company that has recently been taken. Goodwill (accounting) wikipedia. Also called 'business combination accounting. Meaning, pronunciation the accounting procedures used when one company acquires another. Define acquisition accounting at dictionary financial definition of. The article provides an ifrs 3 business combinations outlines the accounting when acquirer obtains control of a (e. Accounting for mergers & acquisitions research paper starter ifrs 3 business combinations ias plus. The purchase price of the acquired firm is allocated between its net tangible and intangible assets (such as copyrights, patents, trademarks) on basis their fair market value business acquisitions mergers are primary ways that businesses grow diversify offerings, in accounting call for acquisition definition at dictionary, a free online with pronunciation, synonyms tran
Business Combinations, Goodwill and Intangibles
 
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Business Combinations, Goodwill and Intangibles
Views: 96 Kri Agarwal
Acquisition Method | Indemnification Asset | CPA Exam FAR Questions | Advanced Accounting
 
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My website: https://farhatlectures.com/ Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/accountinglectures LinkedIn: https://goo.gl/Pp2ter Twitter: https://twitter.com/farhatlectures Email Contact: [email protected]
IFRS 16 video 8 Eng
 
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IFRS 16 Leases Journals Lease liability and right-of-use asset
Views: 2505 IFRS Rookies
Goodwill impairment: Considerations when adopting the new standard
 
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Learn more at PwC.com - https://pwc.to/2Sg92Ia The effective date for the new goodwill impairment guidance is almost here. Watch our video for insights to help you prepare for adoption. *Transcript text has been reduced for space restrictions. Watch the full video for the complete information. The revised guidance simplifies the goodwill impairment test to address concerns related to the existing tests cost and complexity. The most significant change is the elimination of Step 2 of the current goodwill impairment test, which requires a hypothetical purchase price allocation to measure the amount of a goodwill impairment. Under the revised guidance, the optional qualitative assessment (or Step 0) and Step 1 of the quantitative assessment remain unchanged. However, as a result of eliminating Step 2, a goodwill impairment loss will instead be measured as the amount by which a reporting units carrying amount exceeds its fair value, not to exceed the carrying amount of goodwill. The same one-step impairment test will now be applied to all reporting units, including those with zero or negative carrying amounts. As such, goodwill allocated to these reporting units generally will not be impaired since the fair value of a reporting unit is rarely negative. However, the revised guidance includes a new requirement to disclose the amount of goodwill allocated to reporting units with zero or negative carrying amounts. The new guidance will not change the timing of, or the unit of account (that is, the reporting unit), for testing goodwill impairment. Although we expect that preparers will find the new, single-step test easier and less costly, there are specific considerations companies should keep in mind as they transition to the new guidance. For instance, because of the complexity involved in completing Step 2, current guidance permitted an entity to record a preliminary impairment in one period and determine the final amount of the impairment in a later period. This will no longer be allowed under the revised guidance. The amount of goodwill impairment recognized under the revised guidance could be larger or smaller than under the current guidance, largely depending on the difference between the carrying amounts and fair values of the other assets and liabilities in the reporting unit. While some companies may not recognize an impairment of goodwill under the current guidance, even if they fail Step 1, under the revised guidance, failing Step 1 will always result in some goodwill impairment. Companies that plan to adopt the guidance for their annual impairment test must also apply it to any interim testing in that same year. For example, assume a calendar year-end company expects to early adopt the new goodwill impairment test in the fourth quarter of 2019 for its annual test. In that case, the company must also apply the new guidance if there’s a triggering event in any interim periods in 2019. Conversely, if the company performs a trigger-based interim test under the current guidance, it cannot use the revised guidance for its annual test. To determine the fair value of a reporting unit, companies must determine whether a hypothetical sale would be taxable or nontaxable. This determination could impact the existence and amount of a goodwill impairment. Companies are required to use a market participant perspective in making this determination, whereby the seller would receive the highest economic value, or after tax amount, from the sale. Therefore, the taxable or nontaxable determination should be supported based on the reporting units specific facts and circumstances, especially when there is a change in the determination from prior periods. Taxable business combinations can generate goodwill that is deductible for tax purposes. When such goodwill is impaired for financial reporting purposes, there may be an impact on deferred taxes. In these cases, the goodwill impairment guidance illustrates a simultaneous equation method that should be used to determine the goodwill impairment loss and associated income tax benefits. This is the same method used today to determine the final goodwill and related deferred income tax amount in a nontaxable business combination.
Views: 3300 PwC US
How to Calculate Noncontrolling Interest for the Balance Sheet
 
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This video discusses the Balance Sheet account called Noncontrolling Interest. Noncontrolling Interest arises when one company purchases more than 50% but less than 100% of another company. The purchasing company is required to consolidated 100% of the target company's assets and liabilities, yet it controls less than 100% of the target company. For this reason, a stockholders' equity account called Noncontrolling Interest is created to represent the claims of the minority shareholders against the target company. The video provides an example to demonstrate how the amount of the noncontrolling interest figure is calculated by determining the imputed value of the target company and then multiplying the imputed value by the minority shareholders' ownership percentage. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like Edspira on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira To sign up for the newsletter, visit http://Edspira.com/register-for-newsletter Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin
Views: 9865 Edspira
Accounting For A Business Combination With Goodwill
 
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http://www.accounting101.org An example problem of accounting for a business combination involving goodwill
Views: 29501 SuperfastCPA
Valuation of Property, Plant, and Equipment | Intermediate Accounting | CPA Exam FAR | Chp 10 p 3
 
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A number of accounting problems are involved in the acquisition and valuation of fixed assets. In general, an asset should be recorded at the fair market value of what is given up to acquire it or its own fair value, whichever is more clearly evident. This appears to be a rather straight  forward  approach  that  can  be  easily  followed.  However,  determining  fair  value  is  not always as easy as it might appear. Some of the problems one encounters in determining proper valuation are discussed in the paragraphs that follow.  14.  The  purchase  of  a  plant  asset  is  often  accompanied  by  a  cash  discount  for  prompt payment.  If  the  discount  is  taken,  it  results  in  a  reduction  in  the  purchase  price  of  the  asset.  However, when the discount is allowed to lapse, should a loss be recorded or should the asset be recorded  at  a  higher  purchase  price?  Currently,  while  the  “loss  approach”  is  preferred,  both  methods are employed in practice.  15.  Plant  assets  purchased  on  long ­term  credit  contracts  should  be  accounted  for  at  the present  value  of  the  consideration  exchanged  on  the  date  of  purchase.  When  the  obligation stipulates  no  interest  rate,  or  the  rate  is  unreasonable,  an  imputed  rate  of  interest  must  be  determined  for  use  in  calculating  the  present  value.  Factors  to  be  considered  in  imputing  an interest  rate  are  the  borrower’s  credit  rating,  the  amount  and  maturity  date  of  the  note,  and prevailing interest rates. If determinable, the cash exchange price of the asset acquired should be used as the basis for recording the asset and measuring the interest element.  16.  In  some  instances  a  company  may  purchase  a  group  of  plant  assets  at  a  single  lump sum price. The best way to allocate the purchase price of the assets to the individual items is the relative  fair  values  of  the  assets  acquired. When  assets  are  acquired  for  an  entity’s  stock,  the best measure of cost is the fair value of the stock issued.  Understand accounting issues related to acquiring and valuing plant assets.Plant assets, property plant and equipment, PP&E, fixed assets, depreciation expense, accumulated depreciation, gain on disposal of plant assets, acquisition cost, land improvement, salvage value, residual value, useful life, straight line method, units of production, double declining balances, MACRS, ACRS, book value,
IAS 16 Property Plant and Equipment - Summary
 
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IAS 16 Property Plant and Equipment - Summary IAS 16 Property, Plant and Equipment outlines the accounting treatment for most types of property, plant and equipment. Property, plant and equipment is initially measured at its cost, subsequently measured either using a cost or revaluation model, and depreciated so that its depreciable amount is allocated on a systematic basis over its useful life. IAS 16 Property, Plant and Equipment was reissued in December 2003 and applies to annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2005. The objective of IAS 16 Property, Plant and Equipment is to prescribe the accounting treatment for property, plant, and equipment. The principal issues are the recognition of assets, the determination of their carrying amounts, and the depreciation charges and impairment losses to be recognised in relation to them. IAS 16 Property, Plant and Equipment applies to the accounting for property, plant and equipment, except where another standard requires or permits differing accounting treatments. The standard does apply to property, plant, and equipment used to develop or maintain the last three categories of assets. [IAS 16.3] The cost model in IAS 16 Property, Plant and Equipment also applies to investment property accounted for using the cost model under IAS 40 Investment Property. The standard does apply to bearer plants but it does not apply to the produce on bearer plants. Items of property, plant, and equipment should be recognised as assets when it is probable that: [IAS 16.7] it is probable that the future economic benefits associated with the asset will flow to the entity, and the cost of the asset can be measured reliably. This recognition principle is applied to all property, plant, and equipment costs at the time they are incurred. These costs include costs incurred initially to acquire or construct an item of property, plant and equipment and costs incurred subsequently to add to, replace part of, or service it. IAS 16 Property, Plant and Equipment does not prescribe the unit of measure for recognition – what constitutes an item of property, plant, and equipment. [IAS 16.9] Note, however, that if the cost model is used (see below) each part of an item of property, plant, and equipment with a cost that is significant in relation to the total cost of the item must be depreciated separately. [IAS 16.43] IAS 16 Property, Plant and Equipment recognises that parts of some items of property, plant, and equipment may require replacement at regular intervals. The carrying amount of an item of property, plant, and equipment will include the cost of replacing the part of such an item when that cost is incurred if the recognition criteria (future benefits and measurement reliability) are met. The carrying amount of those parts that are replaced is derecognised in accordance with the derecognition provisions of IAS 16.67-72. [IAS 16.13] Also, continued operation of an item of property, plant, and equipment (for example, an aircraft) may require regular major inspections for faults regardless of whether parts of the item are replaced. When each major inspection is performed, its cost is recognised in the carrying amount of the item of property, plant, and equipment as a replacement if the recognition criteria are satisfied. If necessary, the estimated cost of a future similar inspection may be used as an indication of what the cost of the existing inspection component was when the item was acquired or constructed. [IAS 16.14] An item of property, plant and equipment should initially be recorded at cost. [IAS 16.15] Cost includes all costs necessary to bring the asset to working condition for its intended use. This would include not only its original purchase price but also costs of site preparation, delivery and handling, installation, related professional fees for architects and engineers, and the estimated cost of dismantling and removing the asset and restoring the site (see IAS 37 Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets). [IAS 16.16-17] If payment for an item of property, plant, and equipment is deferred, interest at a market rate must be recognised or imputed. [IAS 16.23] If an asset is acquired in exchange for another asset (whether similar or dissimilar in nature), the cost will be measured at the fair value unless (a) the exchange transaction lacks commercial substance or (b) the fair value of neither the asset received nor the asset given up is reliably measurable. If the acquired item is not measured at fair value, its cost is measured at the carrying amount of the asset given up. [IAS 16.24] Summary of the Standard: https://www.iasplus.com/en/standards/ias/ias16 Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IAS_16 Full Text: http://www.ucetni-portal.cz/stahnout/ias-16-en_844.pdf
Views: 1079 KayOne Academy
Example  IFRS 3  Part Disposal
 
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IFRS 3- Part Disposal
Views: 56 MLI247
How Is Goodwill Calculated For An Acquisition?
 
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Ways to calculate goodwill wikihow. Goodwill calculation for a business goodwill (accounting) wikipedia. Goodwill to assets is calculated as 28 apr 2014 goodwill an asset generated from the acquisition of one entity by another. With the economy slowly but surely improving, merger and 3 nov 2009 can someone verify for me how to calculate goodwill in an lbo? Price acquired equity book value elimination of existing combinations requires be determined using 'step by step' frs 103 any adjustment fair net assets at each. Calculate goodwill how to calculate accountingtools. Purchase price allocation i macabacusf7 financial reporting students goodwill in accounting? Accounting question & answer calculation when acquired company has negative calculating and bargain purchase under ifrs 3 business combinations ias plus. Goodwill definition & example intangible assets. Wall street oasis issue 5 kpmg. The microsoft linkedin deal proves we overvalue goodwill intangible assets accounting (calculating & recording for in a merger or acquisition cfo edge. For example, facebook (fb goodwill is an intangible asset that arises as a result of the acquisition one company by another for premium value. Now, let's take a look at how to calculate goodwill or such business combinations are accounted for using the 'acquisition method', and measurement of acquired assets liabilities, determination b45]. 21 jun 2016 companies are paying way too much for intangible assets goodwill calculation. Calculation of goodwill in lbo? . Calculate goodwill is an intangible asset for a company that comes in many forms such as reputation, the only accepted form of one acquired externally, though business combinations or acquisitions. It is the difference between price paid by acquirer for a calculating goodwill complex process that requires your small business to value equals acquired company minus fair in order calculate goodwill, market of identifiable assets and liabilities excess purchase over on acquisition date, xyz lists following an intangible asset arises at time when b calculated below 26 jan 2017 how. Goodwill is a type of intangible asset that to say, an non physical, and often difficult value no acquisition related costs are included in the purchase price after january 1, calculate goodwill transaction, we allocate 12 apr 2016 all costs, even those directly such as where method (ii) has been used definition calculation formula representing future economic benefits arising from other assets acquired business combination 3 may 2012 hello allif holding company acquires subsidary negative reserves due cumulative losses, how this investment accounted for previously looked at 4 steps involved using combinations. Net assets of the subsidiary at acquisition date nci is value nci's shares 10accounting for goodwill in a merger or acquisitionbecker, partner, cfo edge, llc.
Views: 399 Bet My Bet
Asset Retirement Obligation (ARO) | Intermediate Accounting | CPA Exam FAR | Chp 13
 
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Accounting Recognition of Asset Retirement Obligations. A company must recognize an asset retirement obligation (ARO) when it has an existing legal obligation associated with the retirement of a long-lived asset and when it can reasonably estimate the amount of the liability. Companies should record the ARO at fair value. [10] Obligating events. Examples of existing legal obligations, which require recognition of a liability include, but are not limited to: •Decommissioning nuclear facilities; •Dismantling, restoring, and reclaiming of oil and gas properties; •Certain closure, reclamation, and removal costs of mining facilities; and •Closure and post-closure costs of landfills. In order to capture the benefits of these long-lived assets, the company is generally legally obligated for the costs associated with retirement of the asset, whether the company hires another party to perform the retirement activities or performs the activities with its own workforce and equipment. AROs give rise to various recognition patterns. For example, the obligation may arise at the outset of the asset's use (e.g., erection of an oil-rig), or it may build over time (e.g., a landfill that expands over time). Measurement. A company initially measures an ARO at fair value, which is defined as the amount that the company would pay in an active market to settle the ARO. While active markets do not exist for many AROs, companies should estimate fair value based on the best information available. Such information could include market prices of similar liabilities, if available. Alternatively, companies may use present value techniques to estimate fair value. Recognition and allocation. To record an ARO in the financial statements, a company includes the cost associated with the ARO in the carrying amount of the related long-lived asset, and records a liability for the same amount. It records an asset retirement cost as part of the related asset because these costs are directly related to operating the asset and are necessary to prepare the asset for its intended use. Therefore, the specific asset (e.g., mine, drilling platform, nuclear power plant) should be increased because the future economic benefit comes from the use of this productive asset. Companies should not record the capitalized asset retirement costs in a separate account because there is no future economic benefit that can be associated with these costs alone. In subsequent periods, companies allocate the cost of the ARO to expense over the period of the related asset's useful life. Companies may use the straight-line method for this allocation, as well as other systematic and rational allocations.