Home
Search results “Sea ice information”
THE SECRET OF ANTARCTICA - Full Documentary HD (Advexon) #Advexon
 
52:53
* Subscribe for more Scientific & Technological Videos * Like & Share * go to our website http://www.advexon.com * Share your ideas and comment Almost three miles of ice buries most of Antarctica, cloaking a continent half again as large as the United States. But when an Antarctic ice shelf the size of Manhattan collapsed in less than a month in 2002, it shocked scientists and raised the alarming possibility that Antarctica may be headed for a meltdown. Even a 10 percent loss of Antarctica's ice would cause catastrophic flooding of coastal cities unlike any seen before in human history. What are the chances of a widespread melt? "Secrets Beneath the Ice" explores whether Antarctica's climate past can offer clues to what may happen. NOVA follows a state-of-the-art expedition that is drilling three-quarters of a mile into the Antarctic seafloor. The drill is recovering rock cores that reveal intimate details of climate and fauna from a time in the distant past when the Earth was just a few degrees warmer than it is today. As researchers grapple with the harshest conditions on the planet, they discover astonishing new clues about Antarctica's past—clues that carry ominous implications for coastal cities around the globe. documentary 2018, documentary music, documentary space, documentary song, documentary war, documentary crime, documentary channel, documentary ww2, documentary science, documentary hd, documentary, documentary now, documentary about, documentary ancient, documentary aliens, documentary animal, documentary america, documentary art, documentary about god, documentary amazon, documentary about love, documentary ai, a documentary film, a documentary about depression, a documentary about life, a documentary story of the buddha's life, a documentary of prostitution area in bangladesh, a documentary about space, a documentary about the important things, a documentary about canada, a documentary on school dress code, a documentary about animals, documentary bbc, documentary best, documentary bible, documentary bigfoot, documentary brain, documentary business, documentary bangla, documentary babies, documentary brazil, documentary birds, max b documentary, proxima b documentary, r&b documentary, group b documentary, doe b documentary, lil b documentary, mel b documentary, plan b documentary, bun b documentary, b.o.b documentary, documentary china, documentary cars, documentary columbine, documentary cia, documentary children, documentary cold war, documentary culture, documentary cats, documentary comedy, pimp c documentary, andy c documentary, b b c documentary, vitamin c documentary, hep c documentary, d.o.c documentary, hepatitis c documentary, lady c documentary, paul c documentary, washington d.c documentary, documentary death, documentary demons, documentary disaster, documentary dubai, documentary disease, documentary dreams, documentary discovery, documentary dw, documentary documentary, documentary dmt, tenacious d documentary, heavy d documentary, vitamin d documentary, keefe d documentary, initial d documentary, winky d documentary, chuck d documentary, stevie hyper d documentary, lavish d documentary, 1st sfod-d documentary, documentary earth, documentary egypt, documentary economy, documentary eminem, documentary evil, documentary editing, documentary ethiopia, documentary el chapo, documentary english, documentary elon musk, e documentary series boulevard of broken dreams, e documentary selena gomez, eazy e documentary, a&e documentary full episodes, eazy e documentary 2015, jonbenet a&e documentary, poi e documentary, a&e documentary serial killers, maersk triple e documentary, formula e documentary, documentary food, documentary for kids, documentary films, documentary future, documentary fbi, documentary fish, documentary funny, documentary fast, documentary fat, documentary fashion, b.m.f documentary, terminal f documentary, christiane f documentary, f 35 documentary, f 22 raptor documentary, f-14 tomcat documentary, f-16 documentary, f 15 documentary, f scott fitzgerald documentary, f 18 documentary, documentary gangs, documentary ghost, documentary god, documentary gay, documentary guns, documentary gangland, documentary government, documentary greece, documentary giants, documentary gucci, king lil g documentary, warren g documentary, triple g documentary, b.g documentary, kap g documentary, becky g documentary, kenny g documentary, p&g documentary, tom g documentary, ali g documentary, documentary hindi,
Views: 4538079 ADVEXON TV
Top 10 Mysterious Things Found Frozen In Ice Antarctica
 
10:03
10 Strange, creepy and shocking things found on the ice in Antarctica, global warming opens the veil of secrecy over unique finds that have been buried in the ice for centuries and centuries. Subscribe to our channel - https://www.youtube.com/c/Top5Top10 All videos - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJl4SRlQIzyOroZqEEn85JwMIajlw4N10 For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] Welcome to the channel "Top 5 Top 10" We create high quality top 10 and top 5 list based videos filled with mind blowing interesting and entertaining facts you are going to love and enjoy.
Views: 25930377 Top-5 Top-10
Age of Arctic sea ice in March from 1984-2016
 
01:18
Arctic sea ice reaches its maximum extent in March, and the end of the winter ice-building season. This animation shows the age of Arctic sea ice in March from 1984-2016. For more information about the status Arctic Sea Ice see http://www.arctic.noaa.gov/Report-Card Animation of weekly values during March from 1984-2016 prepared by NOAA PMEL, adapted from animation by NASA's Visualization Studio based on data provided by Mark Tschudi, University of Colorado.
Views: 1054 NOAAPMEL
10 Strange Things Found Frozen In Ice Antarctica
 
11:11
Antarctica is one of the most mysterious places on Earth. ☃️ It’s the coldest location ever discovered, with an average temperature of -58ºF and an occasional drop to as low as -128.5ºF. ❄️ In addition, this continent remains the least explored. Antarctica has no time zones, no countries, and only 2 ATMs. We're gonna tell you about 10 mysterious and bizarre findings that have been discovered in the ice of Antarctica. TIMESTAMPS: Elongated skulls 2:42 An ancient meteorite 3:28 Ancient fossils 4:19 Petrified remains of an unusual animal 5:01 Blood waterfall 5:44 Dry valleys 6:26 100-year-old whiskey 7:23 A scary creature 8:06 An underground lake 8:43 A frozen ship 9:36 #antarctica #unusualanimal #frozeninice Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music Achilles - Strings by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100463 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Evening of Chaos by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1300041 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ SUMMARY: - This was a truly shocking discovery: 3 elongated skulls were found in Antarctica in 2014. These skulls were the first human remains uncovered in Antarctica. - For the last 50 years, people have found more than 10,000 meteorites in Antarctica. Some of them are more than 700,000 years old. - It turns out that dinosaurs used to live in Antarctica! Since the ‘80s, scientists have discovered almost a ton of fossils there. Most of these remains are more than 71 million years old. - Archaeologists made another amazing discovery in 2009: the ice of Antarctica had been hiding the fossilized remains of a unique creature. It was the size of a modern cat, but, unlike our popular pets, the animal was egg-laying. - An unaware onlooker might easily believe that the Taylor Glacier is leaking blood. Terrifying blood-red liquid indeed flows over the ice and falls into the sea. Luckily, the origin of this water isn't dramatic at all. This unusual waterfall contains so much iron oxide that it makes the water look like blood. - While Antartica is a snow-covered continent, you probably wouldn’t associate it with a lack of water. However, this land is home to one of the driest locations on our planet: the Dry Valleys. - 2 boxes of excellent Scotch whiskey were hidden in the ice of Antarctica for more than 100 years. After archaeologists discovered this unexpected treasure, they didn't remove it from its ice trap immediately because they were afraid of damaging their finding. - At a depth of 1,100 ft, American archaeologists made a truly terrifying discovery — they came across an unknown creature that didn't resemble any other living being known to people. - Scientists know of approximately 400 lakes in Antarctica. Due to incredible pressure, water stays liquid even when its temperature is below the standard freezing point. - In 1914, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition began. Its aim was to cross the icy continent from one side to the other. 2 ships participated in the voyage. Tragically, one of them got stuck in the ice and was crushed. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 6185608 BRIGHT SIDE
NASA | The Arctic and the Antarctic Respond in Opposite Ways
 
01:43
For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/antarctic-sea-ice-reaches-new-record-maximum http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/qa-what-is-happening-with-antarctic-sea-ice The Arctic and the Antarctic are regions that have a lot of ice and acts as air conditioners for the Earth system. This year, Antarctic sea ice reached a record maximum extent while the Arctic reached a minimum extent in the top ten lowest since satellite records began. One reason we are seeing differences between the Arctic and the Antarctic is due to their different geographies. As for what's causing the sea increase in the Antarctic, scientists are also studying ocean temperatures, possible changes in wind direction and, overall, how the region is responding to changes in the climate. This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11703 Like our videos? Subscribe to NASA's Goddard Shorts HD podcast: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/iTunes/f... Or find NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NASA.GSFC Or find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/NASAGoddard
Views: 600287 NASA Goddard
NASA | Arctic Sea Ice Sets New Record Winter Low
 
00:53
Arctic sea ice has reached its peak winter extent for the year, and it’s the lowest winter maximum on record. For more information: http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/2015-arctic-sea-ice-maximum-annual-extent-is-lowest-on-record/ This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11816 Like our videos? Subscribe to NASA's Goddard Shorts HD podcast: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/iTunes/f0004_index.html Or find NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NASA.GSFC Or find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/NASAGoddard
Views: 109532 NASA Goddard
Arctic Sea Ice Minimum Volumes 1979-2017
 
00:33
Latest animation for 2018 here: https://youtu.be/GZzEUJ86PCg Latest visualization of the startling decline of Arctic Sea Ice, showing the minimum volume reached every September since 1979, set on a map of New York with a 10km grid to give an idea of scale. It is clear that the trend of Arctic sea ice decline indicates that it'll soon be ice-free for an increasingly large part of the year, with consequences for the climate. The rate of ice loss in the Arctic is staggering. Since 1979, the volume of Summer Arctic sea ice has declined by more than 80% and accelerating faster than scientists believed it would, or even could melt. I also composed and played the piano music, "Ice Dreams". A longer version played live can be found here: https://youtu.be/_miBCygvO4Y About the data: Sea Ice Volume is calculated using the Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS, Zhang and Rothrock, 2003) developed at APL/PSC. Source data for this graph is available from http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/ More information: The image first appeared in still form on Think Progress, and I decided to try to bring it to life over the following weeks: http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/02/14/1594211/death-spiral-bombshell-cryosat-2-confirms-arctic-sea-ice-volume-has-collapsed/ An earlier video also featured on BBC's Newsnight last year: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19496674 I produced the animation using hand-written perl and php code to create povray scripts, and scheduling task distribution using MySQL between 8 linux servers working in parallel to render 875 frames at 1920 x 1080 resolution. The "farm" renders 22 frames simultaneously taking between 1-2 hours per frame. On completion, ffmpeg combines the individual frames and music into a high quality mp4 video.
Views: 7969 Andy Lee Robinson
Remote sensing and modelling of sea ice
 
55:33
This presentation was given by Leif Toudal, during the session titled 'Remote sensing and modelling of sea ice'. Every two years, ESA’s Earth observation summer schools draws young scientists from all over the world to learn more about remote sensing, Earth system science, modelling and monitoring, and how data can be used to better understand the world we live in. In 2018, the two-week summer school is held on 30 July to 10 August. While the students engage in practical sessions in the afternoons, the morning lectures were streamed live. ★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe For more information visit: http://bit.ly/EOsummerSchool
Sea ice | Crash Course Cryosphere #4
 
17:57
Ice that floats! In this episode, we move off the land and onto the oceans. Introducing the key concept of albedo, the formation of sea ice and a mystery box… - References and sources: The following sources where used in the writing of this episode and their contribution is gratefully acknowledged: http://nsidc.org/cryosphere/seaice/index.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_ice http://science.nasa.gov/earth-science/oceanography/physical-ocean/sea-ice/ http://response.restoration.noaa.gov/sites/default/files/Sea_Ice_Guide.pdf (good images and tells you how to observe sea ice). http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/~louisab/sedpage/basics.html - Further reading The core text books for much of the material covered here and in the rest of the series are: Benn, D. and Evans, D.J., 2014. Glaciers and glaciation. Routledge. Paterson, W.S.B., 2016. The physics of glaciers. Elsevier. Further reading available here: http://www.antarcticglaciers.org/glaciers-and-climate/ice-ocean-interactions/antarctic-sea-ice/ https://www.wunderground.com/climate/SeaIce.asp - Image credits Unless otherwise noted on the image, all images used in this video are credited to Wikimedia Commons and are under the creative commons, non-commercial, non-attribution licence. The Scott Polar Research Institute & Museum retain all copyright to the logo, artefacts and buildings pictured. The British Antarctic Survey retains all copyright to the library footage used. All such images are used with permission for educational non-profit. Map of Franklin’s lost expedition is by Hans van der Maarel - Previously unpublished. CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=42861754. - Disclaimer: Whilst the information provided here is correct at the time of release to the best of our knowledge it is not guaranteed to be free from error. This video is an introduction to the topics covered and not a substitute for in-depth reading and teaching. Please note: this is not an official Crash Course as it's not hosted on the official channel, nor are we claiming to be associated with the official Crash Course. We're using their format with a twist to educate you about science. Please don't sue us Hank, we're just trying to do some good. ---------- II ---------- Thanks to Vlogbrothers for their sponsorship of this video. Money from the Foundation to Decrease Worldsuck contributed to equipment used in this video. Note that the vlogbrothers and Crash Course are separate things - we are not funded by Crash Course! ReCoVER is funded by the EPSRC under grant number EP/M008495/1
Views: 5180 Simon Clark
Arctic sea ice 2011-2013: variability of ice concentration and thickness from new satellite data
 
00:55
(C) KlimaCampus/DKRZ -- Available in HD -- Information on the sea ice are important both for weather forecasting and climate research as well as for the safe and economical navigation on the increasingly accessible shipping routes in the Arctic. Satellite-based microwave radiometers provide the most important data quickly and comprehensively, regardless of cloud cover, and also during the long polar night. Data from the satellite SMOS of the European Space Agency ESA can be used to determine the thickness of sea ice. The sea ice coverage (concentration) was determined from data measured with the satellite sensor SSMIS (Special Sensor Microwave Image Sounder). The determination of ice thickness with SMOS is feasible only if the ice is relatively thin and very cold, which limits this application to the winter months. Visualization by Felicia Brisc (http://www.clisap.de/clisap/people/felicia_brisc), Climate Visualization Laboratory (http://vis.clisap.de) http://vis.clisap.de
Arctic Sea Ice Maximum 2016
 
01:11
On 22 March 2016, the maximum Arctic sea ice extent appears to have occurred. Reaching an extent of 14.52 million square kilometers (5.61 million square miles), this is 20 thousand square kilometers (7.7 thousand square miles) below the previous lowest maximum recorded in 2015, which was the smallest on the satellite record starting in 1979. Overall, there is a declining trend in the maximum extent of about 2.8 % per decade. Credits: NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio AMSR2 data courtesy of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) The Blue Marble data courtesy of Reto Stockli (NASA/GSFC) Visualization Credits Cindy Starr (GST): Data Visualizer Walt Meier (NASA/GSFC): Scientist Josefino Comiso (NASA/GSFC): Scientist Rob Gersten (Wyle Information Systems): Sr. Data Analyst Jefferson Beck (USRA): Producer Maria-Jose Vinas Garcia (Telophase Corp): Producer Michelle Handleman (USRA): Producer
Views: 655 SciNews
Sea Ice Yearly Minimum 1979-2010
 
00:35
The continued significant reduction in the extent of the summer sea ice cover is a dramatic illustration of the pronounced impact increased global temperatures are having on the Arctic regions. There has also been a significant reduction in the relative amount of older, thicker ice. Satellite-based passive microwave images of the sea ice cover have provided a reliable tool for continuously monitoring changes in the extent of the Arctic ice cover since 1979. The ice parameters derived from satellite ice concentration data that are most relevant to climate change studies are sea ice extent and ice area. This visualization shows ice extent in the background and ice area in the foreground. Ice extent is defined here as the integrated sum of the areas of data elements (pixels) with at least 15% ice concentration while ice area is the integrated sum of the products of the area of each pixel and the corresponding ice concentration. Ice extent provides information about how far south (or north) the ice extends in winter and how far north (or south) it retreats toward the continent in the summer while the ice area provides the total area actually covered by sea ice which is useful for estimating the total volume and therefore mass, given the average ice thickness. For more information about these ice datasets, see The Journal of Geophysical Research VOL. 113, C02S07, doi:10.1029/2007JC004257, 2008 In 2007, Arctic summer sea ice reached its lowest extent on record - nearly 25% less than the previous low set in 2005. At the end of each summer, the sea ice cover reaches its minimum extent and what is left is what is called the perennial ice cover which consists mainly of thick multi-year ice flows. The area of the perennial ice has been steadily decreasing since the satellite record began in 1979, at a rate of about 10% per decade. This visualization shows the annual Arctic sea ice minimum from 1979 to 2010. A graph is overlaid that shows the area in million square kilometers for each year's minimum day. The '1979','2007', and '2010' data points are highlighted on the graph. For more information, please visit: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a003800/a003802/index.html
Views: 13016 Nasawhatonearth
Arctic Sea Ice Minimum Volumes 1979-2016
 
00:36
Latest 2017 version here: https://youtu.be/Xh3oakgxZ9w This is an animated visualization of the startling decline of Arctic Sea Ice, showing the minimum volume reached every September since 1979, set on a map of New York with a 10km grid to give an idea of scale. It is clear that the trend of Arctic sea ice decline indicates that it'll soon be ice-free for an increasingly large part of the year, with consequences for the climate. The rate of ice loss in the Arctic is staggering. Since 1979, the volume of Summer Arctic sea ice has declined by more than 80% and accelerating faster than scientists believed it would, or even could melt. I also composed and played the piano music, "Ice Dreams". A longer version played live can be found here: http://youtu.be/_miBCygvO4Y About the data: Sea Ice Volume is calculated using the Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS, Zhang and Rothrock, 2003) developed at APL/PSC. Source data for this graph is available from http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/ More information: The image first appeared in still form on Think Progress, and I decided to try to bring it to life over the following weeks: http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/02/14/1594211/death-spiral-bombshell-cryosat-2-confirms-arctic-sea-ice-volume-has-collapsed/ An earlier video also featured on BBC's Newsnight last year: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19496674 I produced the animation using hand-written perl and php code to create povray scripts, and scheduling task distribution using MySQL between 8 linux servers working in parallel to render 875 frames at 1920 x 1080 resolution. The "farm" renders 22 frames simultaneously taking between 1-2 hours per frame. On completion, ffmpeg combines the individual frames and music into a high quality mp4 video.
Views: 33057 Andy Lee Robinson
10 Arctic Animals for Kids – Snow Animals for Kids – Polar Animals
 
06:25
This video is for Kids who LOVE animals! Which Animals live in the Arctic? Meet 10 of the most interesting animals we’ve ever seen! Learn important facts about each of these beautiful North Pole Animals who like to live where it’s VERY chilly! These animals all live in the Arctic, a very cold region close to the North Pole. The Arctic Ocean has the lowest salt content of any of the oceans. It's also the smallest ocean! But it's home to many fascinating animals. We just made a longer video all about POLAR BEARS! http://bit.ly/PolarBears4Kids Here you can skip to each Arctic Animal: 0:10 Polar Bear - the largest bear in the world 0:51 Sea Otter - the animal with the densest fur 1:25 Ermine - white weasels 1:52 Harp Seal - excellent swimmers and divers 2:22 Narwhal - whale with a very, very long tooth 3:02 Arctic Wolf - looks like a large dog with small ears 3:37 Puffin - live on cliffs and dive into the ocean to hunt 4:06 Wolverine - aggressive little weasel 4:34 Walrus - have long tusks and mustaches 5:16 Orca - aka “Killer Whales” Which was your favourite of the 10 Arctic Animals? Is there another animal you’d like to learn about? Tell us in the comments. We want to hear what you think! Be sure to SUBSCRIBE so you don’t miss our next episode! ↪ http://bit.ly/SocraticaKids ❤❤❤❤❤ You'll love ALL of our animal videos! Bugs http://bit.ly/BUGS4Kids Horses http://bit.ly/Horses4Kids Polar Bears http://bit.ly/PolarBears4Kids Reindeer http://bit.ly/Reindeer4Kids Turkeys http://bit.ly/Turkeys4Kids Pigs http://bit.ly/Pigs4Kids 10 Jungle Animals http://bit.ly/AmazonJungleAnimals 10 Arctic Animals http://bit.ly/ArcticOceanAnimals 8 Halloween Animals http://bit.ly/Halloween_Animals Sharks (Great White & Hammerhead) http://bit.ly/Sharks_4Kids Octopus http://bit.ly/OctopusFacts Big Cats http://bit.ly/BigCatsforKids Australian Animals http://bit.ly/AusAnimals Chinese Animals http://bit.ly/Chinese_Animals Owls http://bit.ly/OwlsforKids Pacific Ocean Animals http://bit.ly/PacOceanAnimals Animal Group Names http://bit.ly/GroupsOfAnimals Bunnies http://bit.ly/BunniesForKids Animal Parents http://bit.ly/Animal_Parents 12 Baby Animals http://bit.ly/BabyAnimalsSK Animal Sounds http://bit.ly/CowSaysMoo 13 Strange Animals http://bit.ly/13StrangeAnimals 9 Herbivore Dinosaurs http://bit.ly/VeggieDinos Spiders http://bit.ly/SpidersForKids Be sure to SUBSCRIBE so you don’t miss our next episode! ↪ http://bit.ly/SocraticaKids ❤❤❤❤❤ Do your kids love science? Learning about animals is a great way to keep kids excited about their natural world. Perfect for kids in school or homeschoolers! Be sure to SUBSCRIBE so you don’t miss our next episode! ↪ http://bit.ly/SocraticaKids ❤❤❤❤❤ We recommend these fun animal books for Little Kids: National Geographic Little Kids First Big Book of Animals http://amzn.to/2sb4d6L National Geographic Cutest Animals Sticker Activity Book: Over 1000 Stickers! http://amzn.to/2u8y6q1 And these are great for Bigger Kids: National Geographic Animal Encyclopedia: 2500 Animals with Photos, Maps, and More! http://amzn.to/2swBuJ8 National Geographic Wild Animal Atlas: Earth’s Astonishing Animals and Where They Live http://amzn.to/2tvOO4x ❤❤❤❤❤ Performed by Cassi Jerkins Written by Cassi Jerkins and Kimberly Hatch Harrison Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison and Michael Harrison Additional artwork by Michael Rosenbaum ❤❤❤❤❤ Creative Commons Picture Credits: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-zoXZc4h_ucneQqVOuzCn6tTMVedvpA89JMtDJUpJoM/edit?usp=sharing
Views: 207963 Socratica Kids
Arctic Sea Ice Minimum
 
03:23
Here's information about how NASA measures sea ice which reached the 6th lowest minimum on record.
Views: 5 WTAJ TV
Arctic Sea Ice Extent in February 2015
 
00:46
http://GreatWhiteCon.info/feb15 - On February 17th 2015 the IARC-JAXA Information System AMSR2 Arctic sea ice extent metric read 13,770,330 km² which is the lowest ever for the day of the year in a record going back to 2003. This video reveals how recent storms in the North Atlantic have "pulled" and then "pushed" the ice down to these new record low levels for the time of year. Original AMSR2 microwave images by the University of Hamburg: ftp://ftp-projects.zmaw.de/seaice/AMSR2/
Views: 1098 Great White Con
Annual Arctic Sea Ice Minimum 1979-2018 with Area Graph
 
00:42
Satellite-based passive microwave images of the sea ice have provided a reliable tool for continuously monitoring changes in the Arctic ice since 1979. Every summer the Arctic ice cap melts down to what scientists call its "minimum" before colder weather begins to cause ice cover to increase. This visualization shows the expanse of the annual minimum Arctic sea ice for each year from 1979 through 2018 as derived from passive microwave data. A graph overlay shows the area in million square kilometers for each year's minimum day. In 2018, the Arctic minimum sea ice covered an area of 4.15 million square kilometers. Credits: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio The Blue Marble data is courtesy of Reto Stockli (NASA/GSFC). Trent L. Schindler (USRA): Lead Visualizer Cindy Starr (GST): Visualizer Josefino Comiso (NASA/GSFC): Scientist Walt Meier (NASA/GSFC): Scientist Rob Gersten (Wyle Information Systems): Sr. Data Analyst Laurence Schuler (ADNET Systems Inc.): Technical Support Ian Jones (ADNET Systems Inc.): Technical Support Joycelyn Thomson Jones (NASA/GSFC): Project Support Leann Johnson (GST): Project Support Eric Sokolowsky (GST): Project Support
Views: 25 About Earth Only
Latest claim: The Greenland ice sheet is growing
 
10:56
00:00 https://www.sott.net/article/348765-Hey-NASA-check-out-DMIs-Greenland-ice-graph-to-obtain-correct-information 00:20 -- https://www.iceagenow.info/greenland-ice-mass-balance-increasing/ (correction, this is the only blog that was not based on the Telegraph story, it comes from a year earlier.) 00:25 -- http://constitution.com/new-study-shows-global-warming-nonexistent-nearly-two-decades/ 00:30 -- https://whatdidyousay.org/tag/danish-meteorological-institute-dmi/ 00:42 -- http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/icecover.uk.php 1:33 -- https://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2017/05/04/arctic-defies-fake-news-stories/ 1:50 -- http://www.dailywire.com/news/16154/global-quackery-earth-has-not-warmed-past-19-years-joseph-curl 2:05 -- http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/05/06/another-arctic-ice-panic-world-temperatures-plummet/ 4:39 -- http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/ 6:59 https://www.dmi.dk/en/groenland/maalinger/greenland-ice-sheet-surface-mass-budget/ 7:48 --http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/v5/n5/fig_tab/nclimate2554_F6.html 9:11 -- http://www.drroyspencer.com/ 10:32 -- Accelerated melt of Greenland ice sheet: "Satellite gravity measurements confirm accelerated melting of Greenland ice sheet" -- Chen et al (Science 2006) "Acceleration of the contribution of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to sea level rise" -- Rignott et al 2011 "Increased runoff from melt from the Greenland Ice Sheet: a response to global warming" -- Hanna et al (2008) "Ice-sheet acceleration driven by melt supply variability" -- Schoof (Nature 2010)
Views: 141050 potholer54
Antarctic Sea Ice Extent, September 1979 to September 2014
 
00:36
This animated series of images show Antarctic sea ice concentration for each September from 1979 to 2014. Sea ice reaches its maximum extent in the Antarctic at the end of the austral winter, usually in September. Extent is derived from concentration. Visit http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews for more information.
Views: 10311 NSIDC
Arctic Sea Ice, September 1979 to September 2014
 
00:36
This animated series of images show Arctic sea ice concentration for each September from 1979 to 2014. Sea ice reaches its minimum extent in the Arctic at the end of summer, usually in September. Extent is derived from concentration. Visit http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews for more information.
Views: 21463 NSIDC
Arctic September sea ice extent, 1979 to 2016
 
00:38
Average September Arctic sea ice extent from satellite data. The magenta line indicates the average ice edge for 1981 to 2010. Visit http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews for more information.
Arctic Sea Ice is Disappearing at Alarming Rate
 
02:56
Arctic sea ice melt in the summer is normal but experts say it's thinner now, disappearing earlier and returning later in the fall. Since the first orbital images in 1979, sea ice coverage dropped an average of 34,000 square miles a year. (Aug. 14) Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress Get updates and more Breaking News here: http://smarturl.it/APBreakingNews The Associated Press is the essential global news network, delivering fast, unbiased news from every corner of the world to all media platforms and formats. AP’s commitment to independent, comprehensive journalism has deep roots. Founded in 1846, AP has covered all the major news events of the past 165 years, providing high-quality, informed reporting of everything from wars and elections to championship games and royal weddings. AP is the largest and most trusted source of independent news and information. Today, AP employs the latest technology to collect and distribute content - we have daily uploads covering the latest and breaking news in the world of politics, sport and entertainment. Join us in a conversation about world events, the newsgathering process or whatever aspect of the news universe you find interesting or important. Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress http://www.ap.org/ https://plus.google.com/+AP/ https://www.facebook.com/APNews https://twitter.com/AP
Views: 8243 Associated Press
Arctic Sea Ice Minimum Volumes 1979-2015
 
00:33
Latest 2017 version here: https://youtu.be/Xh3oakgxZ9w This is an animated visualization of the startling decline of Arctic Sea Ice, showing the minimum volume reached every September since 1979, set on a map of New York with a 10km grid to give an idea of scale. It is clear that the trend of Arctic sea ice decline indicates that it'll be ice-free for an increasingly large part of the year, with consequences for the climate. The rate of ice loss in the Arctic is staggering. Since 1979, the volume of Summer Arctic sea ice has declined by more than 80% and accelerating faster than scientists believed it would, or even could melt. Based on the rate of change of volume over the last 30 years, I expect the first ice-free summer day in the Arctic Ocean (defined as having less than 1 million km² of sea ice) to happen between 2016 and 2022, and thereafter occur more regularly with the trend of ice-free duration extending into August and October. I also composed and played the piano music, "Ice Dreams". A longer version played live can be found here: http://youtu.be/_miBCygvO4Y A full HD 1080p version is available for broadcast, and can be customized on request. About the data: Sea Ice Volume is calculated using the Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS, Zhang and Rothrock, 2003) developed at APL/PSC. Source data for this graph is available from http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/ More information: The image first appeared in still form on Think Progress, and I decided to try to bring it to life over the following weeks: http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/02/14/1594211/death-spiral-bombshell-cryosat-2-confirms-arctic-sea-ice-volume-has-collapsed/ An earlier video also featured on BBC's Newsnight last year: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19496674 I produced the animation using hand-written perl and php code to create povray scripts, and scheduling task distribution using MySQL between 7 linux servers working in parallel to render 810 frames at 1920 x 1080 resolution. The "farm" renders 22 frames simultaneously taking between 1-2 hours per frame. On completion, ffmpeg combines the individual frames and music into a high quality mp4 video.
Views: 16414 Andy Lee Robinson
Arctic Sea Ice Minimum Volumes 1979-2013
 
00:31
Latest 2017 version here: https://youtu.be/Xh3oakgxZ9w This is an animated visualization of the startling decline of Arctic Sea Ice, showing the minimum volume reached every September since 1979, set on a map of New York with a 10km grid to give an idea of scale. It is clear that the trend of Arctic sea ice decline indicates that it'll be ice-free for an increasingly large part of the year, with consequences for the climate. The rate of ice loss in the Arctic is staggering. Since 1979, the volume of Summer Arctic sea ice has declined by more than 80% and accelerating faster than scientists believed it would, or even could melt. Based on the rate of change of volume over the last 30 years, I expect the first ice-free summer day in the Arctic Ocean (defined as having less than 1 million km² of sea ice) to happen between 2016 and 2022, and thereafter occur more regularly with the trend of ice-free duration extending into August and October. I also composed and played the piano music, "Ice Dreams". A longer version played live can be found here: http://youtu.be/_miBCygvO4Y A full HD 1080p version is available for broadcast, and can be customized. About the data: Sea Ice Volume is calculated using the Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS, Zhang and Rothrock, 2003) developed at APL/PSC. Source data for this graph is available from http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/ More information: The image first appeared in still form on Think Progress, and I decided to try to bring it to life over the following weeks: http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/02/14/1594211/death-spiral-bombshell-cryosat-2-confirms-arctic-sea-ice-volume-has-collapsed/ An earlier video also featured on BBC's Newsnight last year: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19496674 I produced the animation using hand-written perl and php code to create povray scripts, and scheduling task distribution using MySQL between 7 linux servers working in parallel to render 770 HD1080p frames. The "farm" renders 20 frames simultaneously taking between 1-2 hours per frame. On completion, ffmpeg combined the frames into a maximum quality mp4, and then I wrote some music and muxed it into final form for 720p upload.
Views: 47484 Andy Lee Robinson
Arctic Sea Ice Maximum Extent: 2018
 
00:36
This visualization of the Arctic sea ice runs from October 1, 2017 to March 17, 2018, the date that the maximum sea ice extent occurred. The visualization portrays the sea ice as it was observed by the AMSR2 instrument onboard the Japanese Shizuku satellite. The opacity of the sea ice shown in this animation is derived from the AMSR2 sea ice concentration. The blueish white color shown on the sea ice is derived from the AMSR2 89 GHz brightness temperature data. The extent of the Arctic sea ice grew to its annual maximum extent on March 17, 2018, joining 2015, 2016, and 2017 as the years with the lowest maximum extents on record, according to scientists at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) and NASA. The Arctic sea ice cover peaked at 5.59 million square miles (14.48 million square kilometers), making it the second lowest maximum on record, at about 23, 000 square miles (60, 000 square kilometers) higher than the record low maximum reached on March 7, 2017. Visualizer: Cindy Starr (lead) For more information or to download this public domain video, go to https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4628#24879
Arctic Ice Has Increased by 40% - What Global Warming???
 
03:02
Profit From Bitcoin, Learn How - https://www.tradegeniusacademy.com Use promo code: hodges for 50% OFF the entire store! Protect Your Information From Big Data - Click Here! https://virtualshield.com/go/hodges/ Use Promo Code: Hodges for 20% OFF! Noble Gold & Silver - https://goo.gl/kx2yzW or call 888-596-7916 Life Change Tea - Rid Your Body From Toxins! https://www.getthetea.com THE COMMON SENSE SHOW Freeing America One Enslaved Mind At A Time WEBSITE: http://www.thecommonsenseshow.com/
Views: 2822 The Common Sense Show
Antarctic September sea ice extent, 1979 to 2016
 
00:38
Average September Antarctic sea ice extent from satellite data. The magenta line indicates the average ice edge for 1981 to 2010. Visit http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews for more information.
PIOMAS Arctic Sea Ice Volume 1979 - 2012 September 2nd
 
00:19
Note: Superseded by http://youtu.be/oFMDmS783Ro Since 1979, the volume of Summer Arctic Sea Ice has declined by 75% and accelerating. The first summer with an ice-free Arctic Ocean for at least a day is expected to happen within a decade. This video by Andy Lee Robinson illustrates the dramatic decline since 1979 until 2nd September 2012 (day 246). Sea Ice Volume is calculated using the Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS, Zhang and Rothrock, 2003) developed at APL/PSC. Source data for this graph is available from http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/ More information: https://sites.google.com/site/arcticseaicegraphs/ http://neven1.typepad.com/ Also featured on BBC's Newsnight: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19496674
Views: 9455 Andy Lee Robinson
Average September Arctic Sea Ice Comparison: 1979 vs 2013
 
00:24
This visualization compares the difference in the area, volume and depth of the average September Arctic sea ice between 1979, shown in blue, and 2013, shown in orange. The data from these two years has been projected onto a circle to provide for easy visual comparison without altering its area or volume. The depth is shown as a histogram that is uniform rotationally around the central axis. Each grid cell of the ground plane is 1,000 kilometers in width, or one million square kilometers per cell. The depth of the sea ice is measured in meters. This data comes from the Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS). This system combines real observations of the Arctic sea ice from 1979 through the present with data of the ocean and atmosphere to produce a complete picture of the changes in Arctic Sea ice area, thickness, and volume. The sharp spike at the center of the visualization represents the very real phenomenon of thick ice ridges formed by ice dynamics. PIOMAS is more completely described at http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/ . Visualizers: Cindy Starr (lead), Horace Mitchell, Helen-Nicole Kostis For more information or to download this public domain video, go to https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4206#19895.
Sea Ice Yearly Minimum 1979-2010 [720p]
 
00:35
The continued significant reduction in the extent of the summer sea ice cover is a dramatic illustration of the pronounced impact increased global temperatures are having on the Arctic regions. There has also been a significant reduction in the relative amount of older, thicker ice. Satellite-based passive microwave images of the sea ice cover have provided a reliable tool for continuously monitoring changes in the extent of the Arctic ice cover since 1979. The ice parameters derived from satellite ice concentration data that are most relevant to climate change studies are sea ice extent and ice area. This visualization shows ice extent in the background and ice area in the foreground. Ice extent is defined here as the integrated sum of the areas of data elements (pixels) with at least 15% ice concentration while ice area is the integrated sum of the products of the area of each pixel and the corresponding ice concentration. Ice extent provides information about how far south (or north) the ice extends in winter and how far north (or south) it retreats toward the continent in the summer while the ice area provides the total area actually covered by sea ice which is useful for estimating the total volume and therefore mass, given the average ice thickness. For more information about these ice datasets, see The Journal of Geophysical Research VOL. 113, C02S07, doi:10.1029/2007JC004257, 2008 In 2007, Arctic summer sea ice reached its lowest extent on record - nearly 25% less than the previous low set in 2005. At the end of each summer, the sea ice cover reaches its minimum extent and what is left is what is called the perennial ice cover which consists mainly of thick multi-year ice flows. The area of the perennial ice has been steadily decreasing since the satellite record began in 1979, at a rate of about 10% per decade. This visualization shows the annual Arctic sea ice minimum from 1979 to 2010. A graph is overlaid that shows the area in million square kilometers for each year's minimum day. The '1979','2007', and '2010' data points are highlighted on the graph. credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio source: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?3802
Views: 117 djxatlanta
Modeling Sea Ice
 
06:02
For more information visit www.FrontierScientists.com.
Views: 380 FrontierScientists
Fran Ulmer: After the Arctic Ice Melts
 
01:00:40
Sea ice in the Arctic is getting thinner and thinner each year. As the ice melts away, shipping lanes will expand and create new opportunities for ships to use faster and more direct routes. Beyond international trade, countries are eager to start development projects and gain access to natural resources. We can see that warmer temperatures will increase activity in the Arctic, but we should also consider what this activity entails. Competition and conflict may arise as countries eye this region. No other nation is more prepared for polar enterprises and protecting untapped natural resources than Russia. The US is also interested in this region for its oil reserves, though this has concerned Canada due to environmental factors. These three nations, along with Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, are all part of the Arctic Council. This governing body is responsible for ensuring the region is safe by encouraging nations to reduce gas emissions and protecting biodiversity. However, it seems these goals will be more challenging as the Arctic becomes more accessible. How will member states of the Arctic ensure the region remains safe? Should we expect a period of greater uncertainty as countries and companies increase their presence and vie for space in the Arctic? In terms of the value of untapped natural resources, will development projects allow countries like Russia to gain a stronger foothold in the world? The Honorable Fran Ulmer, Chair of the US Arctic Research Commission and current Visiting Professor at Stanford's School of Earth, Energy, and Environmental Sciences, joins us for a discussion on the challenges facing the Arctic region. SPEAKER: Fran Ulmer Chair, United States Arctic Research Commission MODERATOR: Craig Miller Science Editor, KQED For more information about this event please visit: http://worldaffairs.org/events/event/1843 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WorldAffairsCouncil/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/world_affairs Website: http://www.worldaffairs.org
Views: 19506 World Affairs
NASA on Arctic Sea Ice
 
03:46
Dr Tom Wagner of NASA explains the sea ice minimum in simple terms. Climate Crocks playlist http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=029130BFDC78FA33
Views: 10708 greenman3610
Sea Ice in the Arctic 2002-  2010
 
07:48
This Video Presentation was created by the Arctic Portal to show the development of Sea Ice from 20. June 2002 to 14 July 2010- The video was put together in connection to a Climate Change and Sea Ice Portal put together by the Arctic Portal. The Climate Change and Sea Ice Portal is a part of a series of information portals providing information on various Arctic Issues http://arcticportal.org/portlets The Video is put together using Images stemming from the IARC-JAXA Information System (IJS) Which is a cooperation between the Arctic Research Center (IARC) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Jaxa)
Views: 621 TheArcticPortal
Arctic Sea Ice from January 1, 2013 to September 10, 2016
 
03:03
This visualization shows the daily Arctic sea ice and seasonal land cover change progress through time, from January 1, 2016, through September 10, 2016 when the sea ice reached its annual minimum extent for the year. The 2016 Arctic sea ice minimum is the second lowest minimum extent on the satellite record, 4.14 million square kilometers (1.60 million square miles). Here the sea ice changes from day to day showing a running 3-day minimum sea ice concentration in the region where the concentration is greater than 15%. The blueish white color of the sea ice is derived from a 3-day running minimum of the AMSR2 89 GHz brightness temperature. Over the terrain, monthly data from the seasonal Blue Marble Next Generation fades slowly from month to month. Satellite-based passive microwave images of the sea ice have provided a reliable tool for continuously monitoring changes in the Arctic ice since 1979. Every summer the Arctic ice cap melts down to what scientists call its "minimum" before colder weather begins to cause ice cover to increase. The first six months of 2016 have been the warmest first half of any year in our recorded history of surface temperature (which go back to 1880). Data shows that the Arctic temperature increases are much bigger, relatively, than the rest of the globe. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) provides many water-related products derived from data acquired by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) instrument aboard the Global Change Observation Mission 1st-Water "SHIZUKU" (GCOM-W1) satellite. Two JAXA datasets used in this visualization are the 10-km daily sea ice concentration and the 10 km daily 89 GHz Brightness Temperature. Visualizers: Cindy Starr (lead), Trent L. Schindler For more information or to download this public domain video, go to https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4535#67785
Antarctic Sea Ice - Expanding Ice on a Warming Planet
 
02:39
A Week in Science is the science brought to you by RiAus. This week: Paul looks at Antarctic Sea Ice before his journey south You can follow A Week in Science throughout the week on Twitter, and join the discussion, by following @RiAus For more information visit http://riaus.org.au/series/week-in-science
Arctic Sea Ice Minimum Volumes 1979-2012
 
00:31
Latest 2017 version here: https://youtu.be/Xh3oakgxZ9w This is an animated visualization of the startling decline of Arctic Sea Ice, showing the minimum volume reached every September since 1979. It is clear that the Arctic will soon be ice-free for an increasing part of the year, with consequences for the climate. The rate of ice loss in the Arctic is staggering. Since 1979, the volume of Summer Arctic sea ice has declined by more than 80% and accelerating faster than scientists believed it would, or even could melt. Based on the rate of change of volume over the last 30 years, I expect the first ice-free summer day in the Arctic Ocean (defined as having less than 1 million km² of sea ice) to happen between 2016 and 2022, and thereafter occur more regularly with the trend of ice-free duration extending into August and October. I also composed and played the piano music, "Ice Dreams". A longer version played live can be found here: http://youtu.be/_miBCygvO4Y A full HD 1080p version is available for broadcast, and can be customized. About the data: Sea Ice Volume is calculated using the Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System, (PIOMAS, Zhang and Rothrock, 2003) developed at APL/PSC. Source data for this graph is available from http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/ More information: The image first appeared in still form on Think Progress, and I decided to try to bring it to life over the following weeks: http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/02/14/1594211/death-spiral-bombshell-cryosat-2-confirms-arctic-sea-ice-volume-has-collapsed/ An earlier video also featured on BBC's Newsnight last year: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19496674 I produced the animation using hand-written perl and php code to create povray scripts, and scheduling task distribution using MySQL between 7 linux servers working in parallel to render 750 HD720p frames for 30 seconds video. The "farm" renders 20 frames simultaneously taking between 1-2 hours per frame. On completion, ffmpeg combined the frames into a maximum quality mp4, and then I wrote some music and muxed it into final 720p form for upload.
Views: 73752 Andy Lee Robinson
NASA | Arctic Sea Ice Live Shot 2014
 
03:04
Dr. Tom Wagner talks about Arctic sea ice and the ARISE mission in this canned liveshot interview. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/earthrightnow This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11627 Like our videos? Subscribe to NASA's Goddard Shorts HD podcast: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/iTunes/f0004_index.html Or find NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NASA.GSFC Or find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/NASAGoddard
Views: 15886 NASA Goddard
Arctic Sea Ice Minimum Volumes on Map of New York 1979-2012
 
00:31
Latest 2017 version here: https://youtu.be/Xh3oakgxZ9w This is an animated visualization of the startling decline of Arctic Sea Ice, showing the minimum volume reached every September since 1979, set on a map of New York to give an idea of scale. It is clear that the Arctic will soon be ice-free for an increasing part of the year, with consequences for the climate. The rate of ice loss in the Arctic is staggering. Since 1979, the volume of Summer Arctic sea ice has declined by more than 80% and accelerating faster than scientists believed it would, or even could melt. Based on the rate of change of volume over the last 30 years, I expect the first ice-free summer day in the Arctic Ocean (defined as having less than 1 million km² of sea ice) to happen between 2016 and 2022, and thereafter occur more regularly with the trend of ice-free duration extending into August and October. I also composed and played the piano music, "Ice Dreams". A longer version played live can be found here: http://youtu.be/_miBCygvO4Y A full HD 1080p version is available for broadcast, and can be customized. About the data: Sea Ice Volume is calculated using the Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System, (PIOMAS, Zhang and Rothrock, 2003) developed at APL/PSC. Source data for this graph is available from http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/ More information: The image first appeared in still form on Think Progress, and I decided to try to bring it to life over the following weeks: http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/02/14/1594211/death-spiral-bombshell-cryosat-2-confirms-arctic-sea-ice-volume-has-collapsed/ An earlier video also featured on BBC's Newsnight last year: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19496674 I produced the animation using hand-written perl and php code to create povray scripts, and scheduling task distribution using MySQL between 7 linux servers working in parallel to render 750 HD720p frames for 30 seconds video. The "farm" renders 20 frames simultaneously taking between 1-2 hours per frame. On completion, ffmpeg combined the frames into a maximum quality mp4, and then I wrote some music and muxed it into final 720p form for upload.
Views: 1999 Andy Lee Robinson
Arctic Sea Ice Timelapse (2005-2008) [1080p]
 
01:14
Sea ice is frozen seawater floating on the surface of the ocean. Some sea ice is semi-permanent, persisting from year to year, and some is seasonal, melting and refreezing from season to season. The sea ice cover reaches its minimum extent at the end of each summer and the remaining ice is called the perennial ice cover. In this animation, the globe slowly rotates one full rotation while the Arctic sea ice and seasonal land cover change throughout the years. The animation begins on September 21, 2005 when sea ice in the Arctic was at its minimum extent, and continues through September 20, 2008. This time period repeats twice during the animation, playing at a rate of one frame per day. Over the terrain, monthly data from the seasonal Blue Marble Next Generation fades slowly from month to month. Over the water, Arctic sea ice changes from day to day. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio. The Blue Marble data is courtesy of Reto Stockli (NASA/GSFC)
Views: 9998 djxatlanta
Arctic September sea ice concentration, 1979 to 2016
 
00:38
Average September Arctic sea ice concentration from satellite data. The magenta line indicates the average ice edge for 1981 to 2010. Visit http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews for more information.
Arctic Death Spiral - March 2013
 
00:47
Arctic sea ice volume as of March 2013, just playing with the data! Latest static graph downloadable here: http://haveland.com/share/arctic-death-spiral.png. 2013 started the year with ONE TRILLION tonnes (1,058km³) less ice than last year - this is a third of the amount of ice remaining at 2012's record minimum. The rate of ice loss in the Arctic is staggering. Since 1979, the volume of Summer Arctic Sea Ice has declined by 80% and is accelerating faster than scientists believed it would, or even could melt. The first ice-free summer in the Arctic Ocean is expected to happen between 2016 and 2022. This latest video by Andy Lee Robinson illustrates the dramatic decline since 1979 until the March 2013. About the data: Sea Ice Volume is calculated using the Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS, Zhang and Rothrock, 2003) developed at APL/PSC. Source data for this graph is available from http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/ More information: Neven's Arctic Sea Ice Blog with some commentary: http://neven1.typepad.com/blog/2013/01/new-piomas-vid.html 3-D Visualization of Arctic Ice Loss http://climatecrocks.com/2013/01/28/3-d-visualization-of-arctic-ice-loss/ Also featured on BBC's Newsnight: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19496674 New York Times: Pondering the Path To an Open Polar Sea, Andrew Revkin http://dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/20/arctic-ice-melt-and-the-path-toward-an-open-polar-sea Washington Post: A sobering take on Arctic sea ice (VIDEO) http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/post/a-sobering-take-on-arctic-sea-ice-video/2012/09/24/cfff98f6-065c-11e2-a10c-fa5a255a9258_blog.html Think Progress: Arctic Death Spiral: The Video http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2012/09/11/832161/arctic-death-spiral-the-video/ Climate Central: Arctic Has Lost Enough Ice to Cover Canada and Texas http://www.climatecentral.org/news/arctic-has-lost-enough-ice-to-cover-canada-and-alaska-14971 Yale Climate Forum: A New Climate State: Arctic Sea Ice 2012 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYaubXBfVqo I produced the animation using hand-written perl and php code to create povray scripts, and scheduling task distribution using MySQL between 6 linux servers working in parallel to render HD1080p frames. The "farm" renders 20 frames simultaneously taking around 30 minutes per frame. On completion, I used ffmpeg to reduce the frames into mp4 720p ready for upload.
Views: 3824 Andy Lee Robinson
Melting Sea Ice in the Arctic
 
39:57
Five Myths About Arctic Sea Ice http://sites.agu.org/sharingscience/files/2013/03/Myths-About-Sea-Ice.pdf Changes in Arctic sea ice coverage are happening at unprecedented rates, with 2012 setting a new record low for sea ice extent. Our ability to predict changes of sea ice loss and understand the impacts on society, from commercial shipping to resource availability, will be driven by further scientific research in the region. Areas for discussion include: current data and what we understand about sea ice in the Arctic, how climate models contribute to future projections, and why we need to be prepared for a seasonal ice-free region. Speakers Cecilia Bitz, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Atmospheric Sciences Department and Affiliate Physicist, Polar Science Center, University of Washington Lt. Commander Kenneth J. Boda, Arctic Strategic Analyst, U.S. Coast Guard, and Prospective Executive Officer of USCG Cutter POLAR STAR Brendan P. Kelly, Ph.D., Assistant Director for Polar Sciences, Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President John E. Walsh, Ph.D., Chief Scientist, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks For more information, please visit: www.agu.org/sci_pol/ Video recorded and edited by AGU
Views: 19507 AGU
Remote sensing of sea ice
 
01:06:56
This presentation was given by Leif Toudal, during the session titled 'Remote sensing of sea ice'. Every two years, ESA’s Earth observation summer schools draws young scientists from all over the world to learn more about remote sensing, Earth system science, modelling and monitoring, and how data can be used to better understand the world we live in. In 2018, the two-week summer school is held on 30 July to 10 August. While the students engage in practical sessions in the afternoons, the morning lectures were streamed live. ★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe For more information visit: http://bit.ly/EOsummerSchool
Tracking Pacific Walrus: Expedition to the Shrinking Chukchi Sea Ice
 
11:46
http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/600 Summer ice retreat in the Chukchi Sea between Alaska and Russia is a significant climate change impact affecting Pacific Walruses, which are being considered for listing as a threatened species. This twelve minute video follows walruses in their summer sea ice habitat and shows how USGS biologists use satellite radio tags to track their movements and behavior. The information identifies areas of special importance to walruses during sparse summer sea ice and as human presence increases in the region from oil drilling and activities such as shipping and tourism now possible with less ice. More information can be found at: http://alaska.usgs.gov/science/biology/walrus/
Views: 76722 USGS
Annual Arctic Sea Ice Minimum 1979-2016 with Area Graph
 
00:22
This visualization shows the expanse of the annual minimum Arctic sea ice for each year from 1979 through 2016 as derived from passive microwave data. A graph overlay shows the area in million square kilometers for each year's minimum day. The date shown in the upper right corner indicates the current year being displayed. Satellite-based passive microwave images of the sea ice have provided a reliable tool for continuously monitoring changes in the Arctic ice since 1979. Every summer the Arctic ice cap melts down to what scientists call its "minimum" before colder weather begins to cause ice cover to increase. This graph displays the area of the minimum sea ice coverage each year from 1979 through 2016. In 2016, the Arctic minimum sea ice covered an area of 3.57 million square kilometers. Visualizers: Cindy Starr (lead), Helen-Nicole Kostis For more information or to download this public domain video, go to https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4573#83507
Arctic sea ice down to second-lowest extent
 
00:26
From the National Snow and Ice Data Center: Despite cooler temperatures and ice-favoring conditions, long-term decline continues. On the left are a series of satellite images from each September since 1979, showing the year's minimum Arctic sea ice extent. For comparison, the image at right shows the September 2008 ice extent. The pink line indicates the 1979-2000 average minimum extent. Arctic sea ice extent during the 2008 melt season dropped to the second-lowest level since satellite measurements began in 1979, reaching the lowest point in its annual cycle of melt and growth on September 14, 2008. Average sea ice extent over the month of September, a standard measure in the scientific study of Arctic sea ice, was 4.67 million square kilometers (1.80 million square miles). The record monthly low, set in 2007, was 4.28 million square kilometers (1.65 million square miles); the now-third-lowest monthly value, set in 2005, was 5.57 million square kilometers (2.15 million square miles). The 2008 season strongly reinforces the thirty-year downward trend in Arctic ice extent. The 2008 September low was 34% below the long-term average from 1979 to 2000 and only 9% greater than the 2007 record. For more information, see http://nsidc.org/news/press/20081002_seaice_pressrelease.html.
Views: 2617 NSIDC
Arctic Sea Ice Collapse 1979-2013/07
 
00:33
This visualization shows the evolution of Arctic Sea Ice volume for every day since January 1979 to July 2013. 2013 started the year with a record low for January - one trillion tonnes (1,058km³) less ice than the same time last year, or a third of the amount of ice remaining at 2012's record minimum. Sea ice rebounded somewhat this year owing to unusual weather, but remains thin. It won't break any new records for volume this year, but the trend is still very clear. The rate of ice loss in the Arctic is staggering. Since 1979, the volume of Summer Arctic Sea Ice has declined by 80% and is accelerating faster than scientists believed it would, or even could melt. Based on the rate of change of volume over the last 30 years, I expect the first ice-free summer day in the Arctic Ocean (defined as having less than 1 million km² of sea ice) to happen between 2016 and 2022, and thereafter occur more regularly with the trend of ice-free duration extending into August and October. This latest video by Andy Lee Robinson illustrates the dramatic decline since 1979 until July 2013. The soundtrack "Arctic Requiem" also by Andy Lee Robinson, is available for free download: http://haveland.com/share/Arctic-Requiem.mp3 You might like this beautiful video on an Arctic theme made by a friend using my track "Escape to Osiris", http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jBdC_MlFiS8 Here is the same data in "Death Spiral" form: http://haveland.com/share/arctic-death-spiral.png About the data: Sea Ice Volume is calculated using the Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS, Zhang and Rothrock, 2003) developed at APL/PSC. Source data for this graph is available from http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/ More information: Neven's Arctic Sea Ice Blog with some commentary: http://neven1.typepad.com/blog/2013/01/new-piomas-vid.html http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/02/14/1594211/death-spiral-bombshell-cryosat-2-confirms-arctic-sea-ice-volume-has-collapsed/ http://climatecrocks.com/2013/02/24/the-making-of-a-classic-climate-graph/ http://climatecrocks.com/2013/01/28/3-d-visualization-of-arctic-ice-loss/ Also featured on BBC's Newsnight in 2012: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19496674 New York Times: Pondering the Path To an Open Polar Sea, Andrew Revkin http://dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/20/arctic-ice-melt-and-the-path-toward-an-open-polar-sea Washington Post: A sobering take on Arctic sea ice (VIDEO) http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/post/a-sobering-take-on-arctic-sea-ice-video/2012/09/24/cfff98f6-065c-11e2-a10c-fa5a255a9258_blog.html Think Progress: Arctic Death Spiral: The Video http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2012/09/11/832161/arctic-death-spiral-the-video/ Climate Central: Arctic Has Lost Enough Ice to Cover Canada and Texas http://www.climatecentral.org/news/arctic-has-lost-enough-ice-to-cover-canada-and-alaska-14971 Yale Climate Forum: A New Climate State: Arctic Sea Ice 2012 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYaubXBfVqo I produced the animation using hand-written perl and php code to create povray scripts, and scheduling task distribution using MySQL between 6 linux servers working in parallel to render 795 HD1080p frames. The "farm" renders 20 frames simultaneously taking around 30 minutes per frame. On completion, I used ffmpeg to reduce the frames into mp4 720p with my music for the final result ready for upload. The process is now automated so I can provide yearly or half-yearly updates with minimum fuss, but I don't want to fill up my channel with hundreds of versions showing little change!
Views: 4952 Andy Lee Robinson
U.S. NAVY OCEANOGRAPHIC PREDICTION SYSTEMS  SEA ICE FORECASTING  ASWEPS  60414
 
29:52
This 1965 unclassified U.S. Navy training film MN-10167 provides details about three oceanographic prediction systems: Sea-Ice Forecasting, Wave Forecasting, and ASWEPS. With the advent of rocket launches such as Polaris A-1 (1:04-1:15) from nuclear submarines, new oceanographic methods were needed for the Arctic Ocean. The Sea-Ice Forecasting Program supported Thule Air Base in Greenland (3:17) and early warning sites (3:23). Nuclear Skate-class submarines such as the Nautilus, Sargo, and Sea Dragon needed to prevent damage when surfacing through ice (4:26). The Naval Oceanographic Office (Navoceano) gathered data from various above and below sources for its Forecasting Center (5:23). These included a DC3 airplane (5:46), a GB5 icebreaker ship (6:41), nuclear submarines, the ARLIS II manned drifting ice station (7:06), experimental portable automatic weather stations (7:35), and joint weather satellite projects with the US Weather Bureau and the Canadian government (8:00). The data was received on high-speed teleprinters (8:45). In 1964, data collection was extended to the Antarctic Ocean to support Operation Deep Freeze, the Navy’s logistic support for the scientific probe at Antarctica. The HMNZS Endeavour (10:51) is shown unloading at the McMurdo Station on Ross Island. Such ships received information from radio teletypes (11:27). On the flying laboratory planes, new equipment includes an infrared temperature sensor (13:12) and buoy tracking devices (13:15). This information is sent to an IBM 7074 (13:37-13:47) data processor. Wave forecasting was needed for creating synoptic and prognostic wave charges and long-range forecasts. Data was sent to computers (15:53) and an Alden Flat Copy Scanner (16:03) distributed charts by radio facsimile broadcasts. NASA also requested wave charts for the barge Promise (16:47-17:10), which transported the Saturn rocket boosters down the Mississippi River. Wave information was also gathered from Argus Island, a Naval research platform 22 miles off Bermuda. Tools shown to transmit data to the lab are a current meter (17:49), a thermistor chain (17:59), and a wave staff (18:13). Another project used sensors to measure both direct solar and reflected radiation (18:45). Airplane stereo photography needed aerial readers to view the photos (19:27). Data continued to be sent to high speed computers and XY plotters, such as the CALCOMP 565 (20:23). ASWEPS (anti-submarine warfare environmental prediction service) was created in the late 1950s to provide oceanographic and meteorological factors. One of its first new projects was to develop a sea surface temperature model. A mechanical bathythermograph (22:15), also known as a BT, was used to measure water temperatures at various depths. An airborne expendable BT is dropped from an aircraft (23:23-24:12) and a shipboard expendable BT is deployed (24:15-24:40). Also used is a near surface reference temperature device (24:51-25:24) and an airborne wave profiler (25:32). A NOMAD buoy (25:44-26:16) gathers information. Data is sent to IBM computers using magnetic tapes (27:50) and a curved follower printer is used for printing (28:07). The success of these new ways of gathering information were proven aboard the USS Gillis ship in 1964. In 1966, a new Oceanographic Air Survey Unit was formed (29:04) under CDRM H.R. Hutchinson. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 402 PeriscopeFilm
2018 Arctic Sea Ice Maximum
 
01:53
On March 17, 2018 Arctic sea ice reached its annual maximum extent, at second lowest in the 39-year satellite record. The maximum is a natural part of the Arctic’s seasons. Sea ice extent in the Arctic shrinks in the summer, reaching a minimum extent in September. In the winter, temperatures drop and extent rises, reaching a maximum around March. The minimum extent has been declining in the past decade. Recently, NSIDC has seen that maximum extents aren’t what they used to be either. Including 2018, the four lowest maximums in the satellite record have occurred in the past four years. NSIDC director Mark Serreze walks us through this unsettling change and its causes. Credit: C. Williams/NSIDC For more information about NSIDC, please see https://nsidc.org. Read more about the Arctic sea ice maximum at https://nsidc.org/cryosphere/icelights/2012/03/arctic-sea-ice-maximum Keep up to date with sea ice conditions in the Arctic at NSIDC’s Arctic Sea Ice News and Analysis: http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews