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NASA | The Arctic and the Antarctic Respond in Opposite Ways
 
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For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/antarctic-sea-ice-reaches-new-record-maximum http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/qa-what-is-happening-with-antarctic-sea-ice The Arctic and the Antarctic are regions that have a lot of ice and acts as air conditioners for the Earth system. This year, Antarctic sea ice reached a record maximum extent while the Arctic reached a minimum extent in the top ten lowest since satellite records began. One reason we are seeing differences between the Arctic and the Antarctic is due to their different geographies. As for what's causing the sea increase in the Antarctic, scientists are also studying ocean temperatures, possible changes in wind direction and, overall, how the region is responding to changes in the climate. This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11703 Like our videos? Subscribe to NASA's Goddard Shorts HD podcast: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/iTunes/f... Or find NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NASA.GSFC Or find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/NASAGoddard
Views: 636290 NASA Goddard
Remote sensing of sea ice
 
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This presentation was given by Leif Toudal, during the session titled 'Remote sensing of sea ice'. Every two years, ESA’s Earth observation summer schools draws young scientists from all over the world to learn more about remote sensing, Earth system science, modelling and monitoring, and how data can be used to better understand the world we live in. In 2018, the two-week summer school is held on 30 July to 10 August. While the students engage in practical sessions in the afternoons, the morning lectures were streamed live. ★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe For more information visit: http://bit.ly/EOsummerSchool
Earth from space: Irminger Sea ice swirl
 
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Copernicus Sentinel-2 takes us over fragments of swirling sea ice off the coast of Greenland, in this week's edition of the Earth from Space programme. Download the image: https://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2019/07/Irminger_Sea_ice_swirl ★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe and click twice on the bell button to receive our notifications. Check out our full video catalog: http://bit.ly/SpaceInVideos Follow us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/ESAonTwitter On Facebook: http://bit.ly/ESAonFacebook On Instagram: http://bit.ly/ESAonInstagram On Flickr: http://bit.ly/ESAonFlickr We are Europe's gateway to space. Our mission is to shape the development of Europe's space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Check out http://www.esa.int/ESA to get up to speed on everything space related. Copyright information about our videos is available here: http://www.esa.int/spaceinvideos/Terms_and_Conditions #ESA #EarthFromSpace #Greenland
Arctic || Antarctic Sea Ice 2009-2018
 
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A time lapse artwork of sea ice extent in the Arctic and Antarctic over the period of 2009 - 2018. Created by Kaya Barry, with use of imagery and data from: National Snow and Ice Data Centre (2016). Daily Sea Ice Extent Data Files, [Northern and Southern Hemisphere Daily Files]. Boulder, Colorado USA: NASA National Snow and Ice Data Center Distributed Active Archive Center. Available at: http://nsidc.org/data/seaice_index/archives.html Arctic/Antarctic images sourced daily from the LANCE Rapid Response MODIS Terra 4km satellite. I acknowledge the use of Rapid Response imagery from the Land, Atmosphere Near real-time Capability for EOS (LANCE) system operated by the NASA/GSFC/Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) with funding provided by NASA/HQ.
Views: 48 kayathiea
Discovering Life Under Antarctica’s Ice
 
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Drew Lohrer is the principal investigator at Science Under the Ice, a project dedicated to studying the resilience of organisms under Antarctica’s frozen ocean. Along with his team of nine scientists, Lohrer dives deep to collect data on sea organisms and deploy incubation chambers along the seafloor. The team of scientists and technicians endure life in one of the most extreme places on Earth, all in the name of discovering the effects of climate change on our marine biodiversity. SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/vR6Acb This story is a part of our Planet Earth series. From mammals to insects and birds to reptiles, we share this great big world with all manner of creatures, large and small. Come with us to faraway places as we explore our great big planet and meet some of its wildest inhabitants. Got a story idea for us? Shoot us an email at hey [at] GreatBigStory [dot] com Follow us behind the scenes on Instagram: http://goo.gl/2KABeX Make our acquaintance on Facebook: http://goo.gl/Vn0XIZ Give us a shout on Twitter: http://goo.gl/sY1GLY Come hang with us on Vimeo: http://goo.gl/T0OzjV Visit our world directly: http://www.greatbigstory.com
Views: 160664 Great Big Story
Arctic Sea Ice Minimum Volumes 1979-2017
 
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Latest animation for 2018 here: https://youtu.be/GZzEUJ86PCg Latest visualization of the startling decline of Arctic Sea Ice, showing the minimum volume reached every September since 1979, set on a map of New York with a 10km grid to give an idea of scale. It is clear that the trend of Arctic sea ice decline indicates that it'll soon be ice-free for an increasingly large part of the year, with consequences for the climate. The rate of ice loss in the Arctic is staggering. Since 1979, the volume of Summer Arctic sea ice has declined by more than 80% and accelerating faster than scientists believed it would, or even could melt. I also composed and played the piano music, "Ice Dreams". A longer version played live can be found here: https://youtu.be/_miBCygvO4Y About the data: Sea Ice Volume is calculated using the Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS, Zhang and Rothrock, 2003) developed at APL/PSC. Source data for this graph is available from http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/ More information: The image first appeared in still form on Think Progress, and I decided to try to bring it to life over the following weeks: http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/02/14/1594211/death-spiral-bombshell-cryosat-2-confirms-arctic-sea-ice-volume-has-collapsed/ An earlier video also featured on BBC's Newsnight last year: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19496674 I produced the animation using hand-written perl and php code to create povray scripts, and scheduling task distribution using MySQL between 8 linux servers working in parallel to render 875 frames at 1920 x 1080 resolution. The "farm" renders 22 frames simultaneously taking between 1-2 hours per frame. On completion, ffmpeg combines the individual frames and music into a high quality mp4 video.
Views: 8601 Andy Lee Robinson
Latest claim: The Greenland ice sheet is growing
 
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00:00 https://www.sott.net/article/348765-Hey-NASA-check-out-DMIs-Greenland-ice-graph-to-obtain-correct-information 00:20 -- https://www.iceagenow.info/greenland-ice-mass-balance-increasing/ (correction, this is the only blog that was not based on the Telegraph story, it comes from a year earlier.) 00:25 -- http://constitution.com/new-study-shows-global-warming-nonexistent-nearly-two-decades/ 00:30 -- https://whatdidyousay.org/tag/danish-meteorological-institute-dmi/ 00:42 -- http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/icecover.uk.php 1:33 -- https://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2017/05/04/arctic-defies-fake-news-stories/ 1:50 -- http://www.dailywire.com/news/16154/global-quackery-earth-has-not-warmed-past-19-years-joseph-curl 2:05 -- http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/05/06/another-arctic-ice-panic-world-temperatures-plummet/ 4:39 -- http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/ 6:59 https://www.dmi.dk/en/groenland/maalinger/greenland-ice-sheet-surface-mass-budget/ 7:48 --http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/v5/n5/fig_tab/nclimate2554_F6.html 9:11 -- http://www.drroyspencer.com/ 10:32 -- Accelerated melt of Greenland ice sheet: "Satellite gravity measurements confirm accelerated melting of Greenland ice sheet" -- Chen et al (Science 2006) "Acceleration of the contribution of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to sea level rise" -- Rignott et al 2011 "Increased runoff from melt from the Greenland Ice Sheet: a response to global warming" -- Hanna et al (2008) "Ice-sheet acceleration driven by melt supply variability" -- Schoof (Nature 2010)
Views: 155694 potholer54
Sea ice | Crash Course Cryosphere #4
 
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Ice that floats! In this episode, we move off the land and onto the oceans. Introducing the key concept of albedo, the formation of sea ice and a mystery box… - References and sources: The following sources where used in the writing of this episode and their contribution is gratefully acknowledged: http://nsidc.org/cryosphere/seaice/index.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_ice http://science.nasa.gov/earth-science/oceanography/physical-ocean/sea-ice/ http://response.restoration.noaa.gov/sites/default/files/Sea_Ice_Guide.pdf (good images and tells you how to observe sea ice). http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/~louisab/sedpage/basics.html - Further reading The core text books for much of the material covered here and in the rest of the series are: Benn, D. and Evans, D.J., 2014. Glaciers and glaciation. Routledge. Paterson, W.S.B., 2016. The physics of glaciers. Elsevier. Further reading available here: http://www.antarcticglaciers.org/glaciers-and-climate/ice-ocean-interactions/antarctic-sea-ice/ https://www.wunderground.com/climate/SeaIce.asp - Image credits Unless otherwise noted on the image, all images used in this video are credited to Wikimedia Commons and are under the creative commons, non-commercial, non-attribution licence. The Scott Polar Research Institute & Museum retain all copyright to the logo, artefacts and buildings pictured. The British Antarctic Survey retains all copyright to the library footage used. All such images are used with permission for educational non-profit. Map of Franklin’s lost expedition is by Hans van der Maarel - Previously unpublished. CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=42861754. - Disclaimer: Whilst the information provided here is correct at the time of release to the best of our knowledge it is not guaranteed to be free from error. This video is an introduction to the topics covered and not a substitute for in-depth reading and teaching. Please note: this is not an official Crash Course as it's not hosted on the official channel, nor are we claiming to be associated with the official Crash Course. We're using their format with a twist to educate you about science. Please don't sue us Hank, we're just trying to do some good. ---------- II ---------- Thanks to Vlogbrothers for their sponsorship of this video. Money from the Foundation to Decrease Worldsuck contributed to equipment used in this video. Note that the vlogbrothers and Crash Course are separate things - we are not funded by Crash Course! ReCoVER is funded by the EPSRC under grant number EP/M008495/1
Views: 5666 Simon Clark
Antarctic Sea Ice - Expanding Ice on a Warming Planet
 
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A Week in Science is the science brought to you by RiAus. This week: Paul looks at Antarctic Sea Ice before his journey south You can follow A Week in Science throughout the week on Twitter, and join the discussion, by following @RiAus For more information visit http://riaus.org.au/series/week-in-science
Scientists Found Forests Under the Arctic Ice, They Were Shocked
 
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The Arctic is all about ice and cold. If you get a chance to visit it, you won’t see much other than ice, snow and bare rocks for miles and miles. In summer, there's a midnight sun that brings constant light, but not warmth: the temperature doesn’t rise above 40 degrees. The only plants are mosses and lichen, and the only locals are polar bears, reindeer and some species of birds. Maybe the jungle is hidden beneath the ice then? Indeed, divers have found sponges of different shapes and colors here – sometimes as high as 6.5 ft. Other videos you might like: 10 Strange Things Found Frozen In Ice Antarctica https://youtu.be/aOtLCXM8Ox8 How Deep Is the Ocean In Reality? https://youtu.be/cl_I2KoGyhw Scientists Finally Show Who The Yeti Is https://youtu.be/eCKggQk_DY4 #Arctic #discovery #brightside TIMESTAMPS: Harsh conditions of the Arctic 0:29 Where are the jungles? 1:18 How do they not freeze to death? 3:04 What do they eat? 4:44 How long do they live? 5:49 Why are kelps important? 6:57 Other changes taking place in the Arctic 9:09 Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: -The Arctic is one of the least welcoming places for life on the whole planet. And there are very few species who’ve managed to adapt to such harsh living conditions. -While Arctic land is too harsh, the coastal waters thrive with life. There are dense forests of kelp, some of which reach a length of 49 ft. -Most creatures living on the sea bottom are ectothermic, which means their temperature totally depends on the temperature of their environment. Some fish and animals produce their own “antifreeze”. -The Arctic species mostly feed on plants and dead animal leftovers that fall from above in the summer. When the sea freezes again, they turn on the energy-saving mode. -Arctic species live up to 70 years, and the species from warmer seas - only 5-10 years. -The growth of kelps will create new shelters and habitats for fish and other sea creatures. Kelps are also important for the economy. They’re rich in ferrum, calcium and iodine, which makes them popular as a source of food. Kelps can be used for other purposes too – say, as fertilizer. -The territory of ever-frozen land in Canada, Alaska, Greenland, Norway and Siberia is getting smaller by 1.5 ft a year. The melting of permafrost and the destruction of the Arctic coast block the light, which, in its turn, causes a reverse process that can stop the kelps from growing. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Stock materials (photos, footages and other): https://www.depositphotos.com https://www.shutterstock.com https://www.eastnews.ru ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 112178 BRIGHT SIDE
Arctic Sea Ice Continues a Trend of Shrinking Maximum Extents
 
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Arctic sea ice reached its annual maximum extent on March 17, according to analysis by NASA and the National Snow and Ice Data Center. The 2018 extent reached 5.59 million square miles, only about 23,000 square miles larger than the lowest maximum on record, in 2017. This continues a trend of shrinking sea ice, with the four lowest Arctic sea ice maximum extents on record in the last four years. Dr. Claire Parkinson explains how and why NASA studies Arctic sea ice. Read more: https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2018/arctic-wintertime-sea-ice-extent-is-among-lowest-on-record Music: Children's Carousel by Maxi Schulze [GEMA], Moritz Limmer [GEMA] Complete transcript available. This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/12898 Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Kathryn Mersmann If you liked this video, subscribe to the NASA Goddard YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/NASAExplorer Follow NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center · Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NASA.GSFC · Twitter http://twitter.com/NASAGoddard · Flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/ · Instagram http://www.instagram.com/nasagoddard/ · Google+ http://plus.google.com/+NASAGoddard/posts
Views: 80249 NASA Goddard
Antarctic September sea ice extent, 1979 to 2016
 
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Average September Antarctic sea ice extent from satellite data. The magenta line indicates the average ice edge for 1981 to 2010. Visit http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews for more information.
Antarctic Sea Ice Extent, September 1979 to September 2014
 
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This animated series of images show Antarctic sea ice concentration for each September from 1979 to 2014. Sea ice reaches its maximum extent in the Antarctic at the end of the austral winter, usually in September. Extent is derived from concentration. Visit http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews for more information.
Views: 10423 NSIDC
Modeling Sea Ice
 
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For more information visit www.FrontierScientists.com.
Views: 398 FrontierScientists
Arctic Sea Ice Maximum Extent: 2018
 
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This visualization of the Arctic sea ice runs from October 1, 2017 to March 17, 2018, the date that the maximum sea ice extent occurred. The visualization portrays the sea ice as it was observed by the AMSR2 instrument onboard the Japanese Shizuku satellite. The opacity of the sea ice shown in this animation is derived from the AMSR2 sea ice concentration. The blueish white color shown on the sea ice is derived from the AMSR2 89 GHz brightness temperature data. The extent of the Arctic sea ice grew to its annual maximum extent on March 17, 2018, joining 2015, 2016, and 2017 as the years with the lowest maximum extents on record, according to scientists at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) and NASA. The Arctic sea ice cover peaked at 5.59 million square miles (14.48 million square kilometers), making it the second lowest maximum on record, at about 23, 000 square miles (60, 000 square kilometers) higher than the record low maximum reached on March 7, 2017. Visualizer: Cindy Starr (lead) For more information or to download this public domain video, go to https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4628#24879
Arctic September sea ice extent, 1979 to 2016
 
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Average September Arctic sea ice extent from satellite data. The magenta line indicates the average ice edge for 1981 to 2010. Visit http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews for more information.
Views: 228 NSIDC
NASA | Arctic Sea Ice Live Shot 2014
 
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Dr. Tom Wagner talks about Arctic sea ice and the ARISE mission in this canned liveshot interview. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/earthrightnow This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11627 Like our videos? Subscribe to NASA's Goddard Shorts HD podcast: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/iTunes/f0004_index.html Or find NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NASA.GSFC Or find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/NASAGoddard
Views: 15938 NASA Goddard
Arctic Methane: Why The Sea Ice Matters
 
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For more information about us please visit: http://www.envisionation.co.uk/arcticmethane Film featuring world renowned experts: Dr James Hansen, Dr Natalia Shakhova, Dr Peter Wadhams, David Wasdell (Apollo-Gaia Project). NASA Animation showing loss of Arctic sea ice: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio The Blue Marble data is courtesy of Reto Stockli (NASA/GSFC).
Views: 39969 Nick Breeze
Tracking Pacific Walrus: Expedition to the Shrinking Chukchi Sea Ice
 
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http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/600 Summer ice retreat in the Chukchi Sea between Alaska and Russia is a significant climate change impact affecting Pacific Walruses, which are being considered for listing as a threatened species. This twelve minute video follows walruses in their summer sea ice habitat and shows how USGS biologists use satellite radio tags to track their movements and behavior. The information identifies areas of special importance to walruses during sparse summer sea ice and as human presence increases in the region from oil drilling and activities such as shipping and tourism now possible with less ice. More information can be found at: http://alaska.usgs.gov/science/biology/walrus/
Views: 78776 USGS
Age of Arctic sea ice in March from 1984-2016
 
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Arctic sea ice reaches its maximum extent in March, and the end of the winter ice-building season. This animation shows the age of Arctic sea ice in March from 1984-2016. For more information about the status Arctic Sea Ice see http://www.arctic.noaa.gov/Report-Card Animation of weekly values during March from 1984-2016 prepared by NOAA PMEL, adapted from animation by NASA's Visualization Studio based on data provided by Mark Tschudi, University of Colorado.
Views: 1171 NOAAPMEL
Animation Shows Disappearance of Arctic Sea Ice
 
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Experts say Arctic sea ice is disappearing earlier in summer and returning later in the fall. An AP animation shows how sea ice coverage has dropped an average of 34,000 square miles per year. (Aug. 15) Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress Get updates and more Breaking News here: http://smarturl.it/APBreakingNews The Associated Press is the essential global news network, delivering fast, unbiased news from every corner of the world to all media platforms and formats. AP’s commitment to independent, comprehensive journalism has deep roots. Founded in 1846, AP has covered all the major news events of the past 165 years, providing high-quality, informed reporting of everything from wars and elections to championship games and royal weddings. AP is the largest and most trusted source of independent news and information. Today, AP employs the latest technology to collect and distribute content - we have daily uploads covering the latest and breaking news in the world of politics, sport and entertainment. Join us in a conversation about world events, the newsgathering process or whatever aspect of the news universe you find interesting or important. Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress http://www.ap.org/ https://plus.google.com/+AP/ https://www.facebook.com/APNews https://twitter.com/AP
Views: 1269 Associated Press
Arctic Sea Ice, September 1979 to September 2014
 
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This animated series of images show Arctic sea ice concentration for each September from 1979 to 2014. Sea ice reaches its minimum extent in the Arctic at the end of summer, usually in September. Extent is derived from concentration. Visit http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews for more information.
Views: 21723 NSIDC
Arctic Sea Ice is Disappearing at Alarming Rate
 
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Arctic sea ice melt in the summer is normal but experts say it's thinner now, disappearing earlier and returning later in the fall. Since the first orbital images in 1979, sea ice coverage dropped an average of 34,000 square miles a year. (Aug. 14) Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress Get updates and more Breaking News here: http://smarturl.it/APBreakingNews The Associated Press is the essential global news network, delivering fast, unbiased news from every corner of the world to all media platforms and formats. AP’s commitment to independent, comprehensive journalism has deep roots. Founded in 1846, AP has covered all the major news events of the past 165 years, providing high-quality, informed reporting of everything from wars and elections to championship games and royal weddings. AP is the largest and most trusted source of independent news and information. Today, AP employs the latest technology to collect and distribute content - we have daily uploads covering the latest and breaking news in the world of politics, sport and entertainment. Join us in a conversation about world events, the newsgathering process or whatever aspect of the news universe you find interesting or important. Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress http://www.ap.org/ https://plus.google.com/+AP/ https://www.facebook.com/APNews https://twitter.com/AP
Views: 9579 Associated Press
Sea Ice Loss in Alaska | Alaska Insight
 
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The decline in seasonal sea ice affects more than just arctic communities. That ice helps regulate world temperatures. Less ice means coastal communities are at risk of rising sea levels and coastal erosion. On this edition of Alaska Insight, we'll discuss the latest information on ice conditions and how the people of Alaska are working to adapt.
Views: 190 Alaska Public Media
Arctic Sea Ice Minimum Volumes 1979-2016
 
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Latest 2017 version here: https://youtu.be/Xh3oakgxZ9w This is an animated visualization of the startling decline of Arctic Sea Ice, showing the minimum volume reached every September since 1979, set on a map of New York with a 10km grid to give an idea of scale. It is clear that the trend of Arctic sea ice decline indicates that it'll soon be ice-free for an increasingly large part of the year, with consequences for the climate. The rate of ice loss in the Arctic is staggering. Since 1979, the volume of Summer Arctic sea ice has declined by more than 80% and accelerating faster than scientists believed it would, or even could melt. I also composed and played the piano music, "Ice Dreams". A longer version played live can be found here: http://youtu.be/_miBCygvO4Y About the data: Sea Ice Volume is calculated using the Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS, Zhang and Rothrock, 2003) developed at APL/PSC. Source data for this graph is available from http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/ More information: The image first appeared in still form on Think Progress, and I decided to try to bring it to life over the following weeks: http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/02/14/1594211/death-spiral-bombshell-cryosat-2-confirms-arctic-sea-ice-volume-has-collapsed/ An earlier video also featured on BBC's Newsnight last year: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19496674 I produced the animation using hand-written perl and php code to create povray scripts, and scheduling task distribution using MySQL between 8 linux servers working in parallel to render 875 frames at 1920 x 1080 resolution. The "farm" renders 22 frames simultaneously taking between 1-2 hours per frame. On completion, ffmpeg combines the individual frames and music into a high quality mp4 video.
Views: 33314 Andy Lee Robinson
Arctic September sea ice extent, 1979 to 2016
 
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Average September Arctic sea ice extent from satellite data. The magenta line indicates the average ice edge for 1981 to 2010. Visit http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews for more information.
Sea Ice Yearly Minimum 1979-2010
 
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The continued significant reduction in the extent of the summer sea ice cover is a dramatic illustration of the pronounced impact increased global temperatures are having on the Arctic regions. There has also been a significant reduction in the relative amount of older, thicker ice. Satellite-based passive microwave images of the sea ice cover have provided a reliable tool for continuously monitoring changes in the extent of the Arctic ice cover since 1979. The ice parameters derived from satellite ice concentration data that are most relevant to climate change studies are sea ice extent and ice area. This visualization shows ice extent in the background and ice area in the foreground. Ice extent is defined here as the integrated sum of the areas of data elements (pixels) with at least 15% ice concentration while ice area is the integrated sum of the products of the area of each pixel and the corresponding ice concentration. Ice extent provides information about how far south (or north) the ice extends in winter and how far north (or south) it retreats toward the continent in the summer while the ice area provides the total area actually covered by sea ice which is useful for estimating the total volume and therefore mass, given the average ice thickness. For more information about these ice datasets, see The Journal of Geophysical Research VOL. 113, C02S07, doi:10.1029/2007JC004257, 2008 In 2007, Arctic summer sea ice reached its lowest extent on record - nearly 25% less than the previous low set in 2005. At the end of each summer, the sea ice cover reaches its minimum extent and what is left is what is called the perennial ice cover which consists mainly of thick multi-year ice flows. The area of the perennial ice has been steadily decreasing since the satellite record began in 1979, at a rate of about 10% per decade. This visualization shows the annual Arctic sea ice minimum from 1979 to 2010. A graph is overlaid that shows the area in million square kilometers for each year's minimum day. The '1979','2007', and '2010' data points are highlighted on the graph. For more information, please visit: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a003800/a003802/index.html
Views: 13513 Nasawhatonearth
Arctic Sea Ice Minimum Volumes 1979-2013
 
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Latest 2017 version here: https://youtu.be/Xh3oakgxZ9w This is an animated visualization of the startling decline of Arctic Sea Ice, showing the minimum volume reached every September since 1979, set on a map of New York with a 10km grid to give an idea of scale. It is clear that the trend of Arctic sea ice decline indicates that it'll be ice-free for an increasingly large part of the year, with consequences for the climate. The rate of ice loss in the Arctic is staggering. Since 1979, the volume of Summer Arctic sea ice has declined by more than 80% and accelerating faster than scientists believed it would, or even could melt. Based on the rate of change of volume over the last 30 years, I expect the first ice-free summer day in the Arctic Ocean (defined as having less than 1 million km² of sea ice) to happen between 2016 and 2022, and thereafter occur more regularly with the trend of ice-free duration extending into August and October. I also composed and played the piano music, "Ice Dreams". A longer version played live can be found here: http://youtu.be/_miBCygvO4Y A full HD 1080p version is available for broadcast, and can be customized. About the data: Sea Ice Volume is calculated using the Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS, Zhang and Rothrock, 2003) developed at APL/PSC. Source data for this graph is available from http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/ More information: The image first appeared in still form on Think Progress, and I decided to try to bring it to life over the following weeks: http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/02/14/1594211/death-spiral-bombshell-cryosat-2-confirms-arctic-sea-ice-volume-has-collapsed/ An earlier video also featured on BBC's Newsnight last year: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19496674 I produced the animation using hand-written perl and php code to create povray scripts, and scheduling task distribution using MySQL between 7 linux servers working in parallel to render 770 HD1080p frames. The "farm" renders 20 frames simultaneously taking between 1-2 hours per frame. On completion, ffmpeg combined the frames into a maximum quality mp4, and then I wrote some music and muxed it into final form for 720p upload.
Views: 47601 Andy Lee Robinson
Oldest sea ice in the arctic starts to melt
 
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Sea ice north of Greenland - some of the oldest and thickest in the Arctic - has broken up for the second time this year, a phenomenon never seen before. Satellite images show ice melting around the coast of the island closest to the North Pole, opening up waters that are usually frozen, even in summer. SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skynews For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: Apple https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-news/id316391924?mt=8 Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bskyb.skynews.android&hl=en_GB
Views: 40178 Sky News
Daily Arctic sea Ice extent from May to September 2013
 
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In this animation, the daily Arctic sea ice and seasonal land cover change over time, from May 16, 2013 through September 12, 2013. Over the water, Arctic sea ice changes from day to day, shown in blueish white. Over the land, seasonal greenness increases and then fades slowly from month to month. See http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a004100/a004104/ for more information about the data. Video courtesy NASA Scientific Visualization Studio.
Views: 809 NSIDC
Arctic Sea Ice Minimum Volumes 1979-2015
 
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Latest 2017 version here: https://youtu.be/Xh3oakgxZ9w This is an animated visualization of the startling decline of Arctic Sea Ice, showing the minimum volume reached every September since 1979, set on a map of New York with a 10km grid to give an idea of scale. It is clear that the trend of Arctic sea ice decline indicates that it'll be ice-free for an increasingly large part of the year, with consequences for the climate. The rate of ice loss in the Arctic is staggering. Since 1979, the volume of Summer Arctic sea ice has declined by more than 80% and accelerating faster than scientists believed it would, or even could melt. Based on the rate of change of volume over the last 30 years, I expect the first ice-free summer day in the Arctic Ocean (defined as having less than 1 million km² of sea ice) to happen between 2016 and 2022, and thereafter occur more regularly with the trend of ice-free duration extending into August and October. I also composed and played the piano music, "Ice Dreams". A longer version played live can be found here: http://youtu.be/_miBCygvO4Y A full HD 1080p version is available for broadcast, and can be customized on request. About the data: Sea Ice Volume is calculated using the Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS, Zhang and Rothrock, 2003) developed at APL/PSC. Source data for this graph is available from http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/ More information: The image first appeared in still form on Think Progress, and I decided to try to bring it to life over the following weeks: http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/02/14/1594211/death-spiral-bombshell-cryosat-2-confirms-arctic-sea-ice-volume-has-collapsed/ An earlier video also featured on BBC's Newsnight last year: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19496674 I produced the animation using hand-written perl and php code to create povray scripts, and scheduling task distribution using MySQL between 7 linux servers working in parallel to render 810 frames at 1920 x 1080 resolution. The "farm" renders 22 frames simultaneously taking between 1-2 hours per frame. On completion, ffmpeg combines the individual frames and music into a high quality mp4 video.
Views: 16528 Andy Lee Robinson
Watch 25 Years of Arctic Sea Ice Disappear in 1 Minute
 
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VIDEO CREDIT: NOAA Since the 1980s, the amount of perennial ice in the Arctic has declined. This animation tracks the relative amount of ice of different ages from 1987 through early November 2015. The oldest ice is white; the youngest (seasonal) ice is dark blue. Key patterns are the export of ice from the Arctic through Fram Strait and the melting of old ice as it passes through the warm waters of the Beaufort Sea. In 1985, 20% of the Arctic ice pack was very old ice, but in March 2015, old ice only constituted 3% of the ice pack. Animation by NOAA Climate.gov team, based on research data provided by Mark Tschudi, CCAR, University of Colorado. Sea ice age is estimated by tracking of ice parcels using satellite imagery and drifting ocean buoys. References: Charctic Interactive Sea Ice Graph. National Snow and Ice Data Center. Accessed December 9, 2015. Perovich, D., W. Meier, M. Tschudi, S. Farrell, S. Gerland, and S. Hendricks. (2015). Chapter 4: Sea Ice. In Jeffries, M.O., Richter-Menge, J., Overland, J.E. (2015) Arctic Report Card: Update for 2015.
Views: 85570 climatecentral
Annual Arctic Sea Ice Minimum 1979-2015 with Area Graph
 
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Satellite-based passive microwave images of the sea ice have provided a reliable tool for continuously monitoring changes in the Arctic ice since 1979. Every summer the Arctic ice cap melts down to what scientists call its 'minimum' before colder weather begins to cause ice cover to increase. This visualization shows the expanse of the annual minimum Arctic sea ice for each year from 1979 through 2015. A semi-transparent graph overlay shows the area in millions of square kilometers for each year's minimum day. The date shown in the upper right corner indicates the current year being displayed. For more information or to download this public domain video, go to https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4435#32744.
NASA on Arctic Sea Ice
 
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Dr Tom Wagner of NASA explains the sea ice minimum in simple terms. Climate Crocks playlist http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=029130BFDC78FA33
Views: 10789 greenman3610
Sea ice decline "unprecedented," according to Arctic Report Card
 
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The annual Arctic Report Card says the pace of "sea-ice decline and surface ocean warming is unprecedented in at least the last 1,500 years." Scientists estimate that over the last 15 years, the Greenland ice sheet lost up to 270 billion tons of mass each year. That contributes to rising sea levels. Subscribe to the "CBS This Morning" Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/1Q0v2hE Watch "CBS This Morning" HERE: http://bit.ly/1T88yAR Watch the latest installment of "Note to Self," only on "CBS This Morning," HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Sh8XlB Follow "CBS This Morning" on Instagram HERE: http://bit.ly/1Q7NGnY Like "CBS This Morning" on Facebook HERE: http://on.fb.me/1LhtdvI Follow "CBS This Morning" on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Xj5W3p Follow "CBS This Morning" on Google+ HERE: http://bit.ly/1SIM4I8 Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! http://bit.ly/1OQA29B Delivered by Norah O’Donnell and Gayle King, "CBS This Morning" offers a thoughtful, substantive and insightful source of news and information to a daily audience of 3 million viewers. The Emmy Award-winning broadcast presents a mix of daily news, coverage of developing stories of national and global significance, and interviews with leading figures in politics, business and entertainment. Check local listings for "CBS This Morning" broadcast times.
Views: 1228 CBS This Morning
Ted Scambos on NASA Satellites and Sea Ice
 
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The National Snow and Ice Data Center's Ted Scambos PhD - in part of our recent conversation about sea ice. I asked Ted to clarify stories about how scientists dealt with the failure of one of the observation satellites during melt season - which has been a topic of climate denial trollers for months.
Views: 1922 greenman3610
Higher rates of microplastic particles found in Arctic sea ice
 
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German researchers found much higher rates of plastic particles in Arctic sea ice than previously known. It's a form of contamination that, though small, threatens life throughout the region. Time magazine editor-at-large Jeffrey Kluger joins "CBS This Morning: Saturday" to discuss the cause and impact of the threat. Subscribe to the "CBS This Morning" Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/1Q0v2hE Watch "CBS This Morning" HERE: http://bit.ly/1T88yAR Watch the latest installment of "Note to Self," only on "CBS This Morning," HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Sh8XlB Follow "CBS This Morning" on Instagram HERE: http://bit.ly/1Q7NGnY Like "CBS This Morning" on Facebook HERE: http://on.fb.me/1LhtdvI Follow "CBS This Morning" on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Xj5W3p Follow "CBS This Morning" on Google+ HERE: http://bit.ly/1SIM4I8 Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! http://bit.ly/1OQA29B Delivered by Norah O’Donnell and Gayle King, "CBS This Morning" offers a thoughtful, substantive and insightful source of news and information to a daily audience of 3 million viewers. The Emmy Award-winning broadcast presents a mix of daily news, coverage of developing stories of national and global significance, and interviews with leading figures in politics, business and entertainment. Check local listings for "CBS This Morning" broadcast times.
Views: 834 CBS This Morning
Animation Shows Disappearance of Arctic Sea Ice
 
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Experts say Arctic sea ice is disappearing earlier in summer and returning later in the fall. An AP animation shows how sea ice coverage has dropped an average of 34,000 square miles per year. (Aug. 14) Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress Get updates and more Breaking News here: http://smarturl.it/APBreakingNews The Associated Press is the essential global news network, delivering fast, unbiased news from every corner of the world to all media platforms and formats. AP’s commitment to independent, comprehensive journalism has deep roots. Founded in 1846, AP has covered all the major news events of the past 165 years, providing high-quality, informed reporting of everything from wars and elections to championship games and royal weddings. AP is the largest and most trusted source of independent news and information. Today, AP employs the latest technology to collect and distribute content - we have daily uploads covering the latest and breaking news in the world of politics, sport and entertainment. Join us in a conversation about world events, the newsgathering process or whatever aspect of the news universe you find interesting or important. Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress http://www.ap.org/ https://plus.google.com/+AP/ https://www.facebook.com/APNews https://twitter.com/AP
Views: 2093 Associated Press
NASA | Arctic Sea Ice Sets New Record Winter Low
 
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Arctic sea ice has reached its peak winter extent for the year, and it’s the lowest winter maximum on record. For more information: http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/2015-arctic-sea-ice-maximum-annual-extent-is-lowest-on-record/ This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11816 Like our videos? Subscribe to NASA's Goddard Shorts HD podcast: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/iTunes/f0004_index.html Or find NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NASA.GSFC Or find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/NASAGoddard
Views: 110079 NASA Goddard
Annual Arctic Sea Ice Minimum 1979-2016 with Area Graph
 
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This visualization shows the expanse of the annual minimum Arctic sea ice for each year from 1979 through 2016 as derived from passive microwave data. A graph overlay shows the area in million square kilometers for each year's minimum day. The date shown in the upper right corner indicates the current year being displayed. Satellite-based passive microwave images of the sea ice have provided a reliable tool for continuously monitoring changes in the Arctic ice since 1979. Every summer the Arctic ice cap melts down to what scientists call its "minimum" before colder weather begins to cause ice cover to increase. This graph displays the area of the minimum sea ice coverage each year from 1979 through 2016. In 2016, the Arctic minimum sea ice covered an area of 3.57 million square kilometers. Visualizers: Cindy Starr (lead), Helen-Nicole Kostis For more information or to download this public domain video, go to https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4573#83507
Animals in the Antarctic Ice
 
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Animals in the Antarctic Ice The wildlife of Antarctica are extremophiles, having to adapt to the dryness, low temperatures, and high exposure common in Antartica. The extreme weather of the interior contrasts to the relatively mild conditions on the Antarctic Peninsula and the subantarctic islands, which have warmer temperatures and more liquid water. Much of the ocean around the mainland is covered by sea ice. The oceans themselves are a more stable environment for life, both in the water column and on the seabed. The Antarctic ice sheet is one of the two polar ice caps of the Earth. It covers about 98% of the Antarctic continent and is the largest single mass of ice on Earth. It covers an area of almost 14 million square km and contains 26.5 million cubic km of ice.[2] That is, approximately 61 percent of all fresh water on the Earth is held in the Antarctic ice sheet, an amount equivalent to 70 m of water in the world's oceans. In East Antarctica, the ice sheet rests on a major land mass, but in West Antarctica the bed can extend to more than 2,500 m below sea level. The land in this area would be seabed if the ice sheet were not there.
Views: 1025427 funnyvideos215
Arctic September sea ice concentration, 1979 to 2016
 
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Average September Arctic sea ice concentration from satellite data. The magenta line indicates the average ice edge for 1981 to 2010. Visit http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews for more information.
Arctic Sea Ice from January 1, 2013 to September 10, 2016
 
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This visualization shows the daily Arctic sea ice and seasonal land cover change progress through time, from January 1, 2016, through September 10, 2016 when the sea ice reached its annual minimum extent for the year. The 2016 Arctic sea ice minimum is the second lowest minimum extent on the satellite record, 4.14 million square kilometers (1.60 million square miles). Here the sea ice changes from day to day showing a running 3-day minimum sea ice concentration in the region where the concentration is greater than 15%. The blueish white color of the sea ice is derived from a 3-day running minimum of the AMSR2 89 GHz brightness temperature. Over the terrain, monthly data from the seasonal Blue Marble Next Generation fades slowly from month to month. Satellite-based passive microwave images of the sea ice have provided a reliable tool for continuously monitoring changes in the Arctic ice since 1979. Every summer the Arctic ice cap melts down to what scientists call its "minimum" before colder weather begins to cause ice cover to increase. The first six months of 2016 have been the warmest first half of any year in our recorded history of surface temperature (which go back to 1880). Data shows that the Arctic temperature increases are much bigger, relatively, than the rest of the globe. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) provides many water-related products derived from data acquired by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) instrument aboard the Global Change Observation Mission 1st-Water "SHIZUKU" (GCOM-W1) satellite. Two JAXA datasets used in this visualization are the 10-km daily sea ice concentration and the 10 km daily 89 GHz Brightness Temperature. Visualizers: Cindy Starr (lead), Trent L. Schindler For more information or to download this public domain video, go to https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4535#67785
Antarctic September sea ice concentration, 1979 to 2016
 
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Average September Antarctic sea ice concentration from satellite data. The magenta line indicates the average ice edge for 1981 to 2010. Visit http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews for more information.
Views: 23 NSIDC
Arctic Sea Ice Timelapse (2005-2008) [1080p]
 
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Sea ice is frozen seawater floating on the surface of the ocean. Some sea ice is semi-permanent, persisting from year to year, and some is seasonal, melting and refreezing from season to season. The sea ice cover reaches its minimum extent at the end of each summer and the remaining ice is called the perennial ice cover. In this animation, the globe slowly rotates one full rotation while the Arctic sea ice and seasonal land cover change throughout the years. The animation begins on September 21, 2005 when sea ice in the Arctic was at its minimum extent, and continues through September 20, 2008. This time period repeats twice during the animation, playing at a rate of one frame per day. Over the terrain, monthly data from the seasonal Blue Marble Next Generation fades slowly from month to month. Over the water, Arctic sea ice changes from day to day. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio. The Blue Marble data is courtesy of Reto Stockli (NASA/GSFC)
Views: 10162 djxatlanta
Melting Sea Ice in the Arctic
 
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Five Myths About Arctic Sea Ice http://sites.agu.org/sharingscience/files/2013/03/Myths-About-Sea-Ice.pdf Changes in Arctic sea ice coverage are happening at unprecedented rates, with 2012 setting a new record low for sea ice extent. Our ability to predict changes of sea ice loss and understand the impacts on society, from commercial shipping to resource availability, will be driven by further scientific research in the region. Areas for discussion include: current data and what we understand about sea ice in the Arctic, how climate models contribute to future projections, and why we need to be prepared for a seasonal ice-free region. Speakers Cecilia Bitz, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Atmospheric Sciences Department and Affiliate Physicist, Polar Science Center, University of Washington Lt. Commander Kenneth J. Boda, Arctic Strategic Analyst, U.S. Coast Guard, and Prospective Executive Officer of USCG Cutter POLAR STAR Brendan P. Kelly, Ph.D., Assistant Director for Polar Sciences, Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President John E. Walsh, Ph.D., Chief Scientist, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks For more information, please visit: www.agu.org/sci_pol/ Video recorded and edited by AGU
Views: 19601 AGU
Deep Bore Into Antarctica Finds Freezing Ice, Not Melting as Expected | National Geographic
 
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At the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica, scientists used a hot-water drill hose to create a hole through the thick ice until they reached the perpetually dark water. What they found surprised them. Christina Hulbe/University of Otago/K061 ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe #NationalGeographic #Antarctica #Ice About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta This is the Ross Ice Shelf – the biggest floating ice shelf in Antarctica. Such shelves are important because they hold back a vast amount of ice. If all such West Antarctic shelves were to collapse and spill the ice into the ocean then global sea level would rise by 10 feet. Beneath the Ross Ice Shelf is one of the least explored bits of ocean on Earth. New Zealand scientists used a hot-water drill hose to create a hole through the thick ice until they reached the perpetually dark water. They hoped to study the health and history of the shelf. Their findings surprised them. They found that the ice in the hole itself and along the base of the shelf was crystalizing and freezing rather than melting. Measurements will be taken for the next few years, to see how the Ross Ice Shelf is changing over time. Read more in "Deep Bore Into Antarctica Finds Freezing Ice, Not Melting as Expected" https://bit.ly/2LSDgkW Deep Bore Into Antarctica Finds Freezing Ice, Not Melting as Expected | National Geographic https://youtu.be/fyjt5zpNAeg National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 2764935 National Geographic
Arctic Sea Ice Extent in February 2015
 
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http://GreatWhiteCon.info/feb15 - On February 17th 2015 the IARC-JAXA Information System AMSR2 Arctic sea ice extent metric read 13,770,330 km² which is the lowest ever for the day of the year in a record going back to 2003. This video reveals how recent storms in the North Atlantic have "pulled" and then "pushed" the ice down to these new record low levels for the time of year. Original AMSR2 microwave images by the University of Hamburg: ftp://ftp-projects.zmaw.de/seaice/AMSR2/
Views: 1104 Great White Con
Sea Ice Physics & Ecosystem eXperiment II
 
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For the first time under-ice and airborne vehicles will be used simultaneously to investigate the impacts of climate change on the sea-ice environment off East Antarctica. More than 50 scientists, from nine countries leave Hobart on Friday 14 September aboard Australia's icebreaker Aurora Australis to gather information critical for a greater understanding of the connection between sea ice and Southern Ocean ecosystems. Read more at: http://www.antarctica.gov.au/media/news/2012/high-tech-voyage-will-investigate-life-in-the-sea-ice-zone.
Views: 565 AusAntarctic
Sea ice - Video Learning - WizScience.com
 
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"Sea ice" is frozen seawater. Because ice is less dense than water, it floats on the ocean's surface . Sea ice covers about 7% of the Earth’s surface and about 12% of the world’s oceans. In the North, it is found in the Arctic Ocean, in areas just below it and in other cold oceans, seas and gulfs; in the Antarctic, it occurs in various areas around Antarctica . Much of the world's sea ice is enclosed within the polar ice packs in the Earth's polar regions: the Arctic ice pack of the Arctic Ocean and the Antarctic ice pack of the Southern Ocean. Polar packs undergo a significant yearly cycling in surface extent , a natural process upon which depends the Arctic ecology, including the ocean's ecosystems. Due to the action of winds, currents and temperature fluctuations, sea ice is very dynamic, leading to a wide variety of ice types and features. Sea ice may be contrasted with icebergs, which are chunks of ice shelves or glaciers that calve into the ocean. Depending on location, sea ice expanses may also incorporate icebergs. Sea ice does not simply grow and melt. During its lifespan, it is very dynamic. Due to the combined action of winds, currents and air temperature fluctuations, sea ice expanses typically undergo a significant amount of deformation. Sea ice is classified according to whether or not it is able to drift, and according to its age. Sea ice can be classified according to whether or not it is attached to the shoreline . If attached, it is called landfast ice, or more often, fast ice . Alternatively, and unlike fast ice, drift ice occurs further offshore in very wide areas, and encompasses ice that is free to move with currents and winds. The physical boundary between fast ice and drift ice is the "fast ice boundary". The drift ice zone may be further divided into a "shear zone", a "marginal ice zone" and a "central pack". Drift ice consists of "floes", individual pieces of sea ice 20 m or more across. There are names for various floe sizes: "small" – 20 m to 100 m; "medium" – 100 m to 500 m; "big" – 500 m to 2000 m; "vast" – 2 km to 10 km; and "giant" – more than 10 km. The term "pack ice" is used either as a synonym to "drift ice", or to designate drift ice zone in which the floes are densely packed. The overall sea ice cover is termed the "ice canopy" . Wiz Science™ is "the" learning channel for children and all ages. SUBSCRIBE TODAY Disclaimer: This video is for your information only. The author or publisher does not guarantee the accuracy of the content presented in this video. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Background Music: "The Place Inside" by Silent Partner (royalty-free) from YouTube Audio Library. This video uses material/images from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea+ice, which is released under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . This video is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . To reuse/adapt the content in your own work, you must comply with the license terms.
Views: 1053 Wiz Science™